I agree to Idea ?Training requirements for Tech Core
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I disagree to Idea ?Training requirements for Tech Core

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Private Sector Technology Volunteers Supporting Disaster Response »

?Training requirements for Tech Core

Fundamentals of Emergency Management are a great start, but tech teams should be versed in disaster technologies including NIEM, IPAWS, UICDS

GIS, EDXL, Social Media, Infosec

http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/courseOverview.aspx?code=is-247.a

http://www.uicds.us/

http://gis.fema.gov/

https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/17227/EDXL-DE_Spec_v1.0.html

http://www.sm4em.org/

https://www.niem.gov

http://www.us-cert.gov/

Comment

Submitted by 11 months ago

Comments (11)

  1. Sounds like someone works for National Disaster Preparedness Training Center (NDPTC). It worked for me and might be the best in the big picture too.Fundamentals of Emergency Management (G-230/IS-230) are a great start but the PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERIES (PDS){IS 120; IS 230; IS 235; IS 240; IS 241; IS 242; and IS 244} might enhance the knowledge base.

    10 months ago
  2. Agree with MJ...PDS is well worth the time...

    8 months ago
  3. Agreement is afforded all the way around on this topic. However, it is very doubtful if the list of courses already discussed will render a solution to a 'WORST CASE SCENARIO'. Much more is needed for 'TECH-TEAMS'. To common it is created by administrative protocol of one leader per unit, most training for the leader and less for the rest. 'TECH-TEAMS' need to be trained equally to at least 3 deep and the ideal is 5 to 7 deep per unit. Least the leader is unable to report we'll experience less capability on site. Planning, training, equipping, exercising, qualifying evaluating and, credentialing are in order to achieve desired outcomes.Plans, training, and equipment, and the capabilities they represent, are validated through exercises. Exercise evaluation informs preparedness priorities by highlighting potential preparedness shortfalls in the areas of planning, organization, training, and equipment prior to real-world incidents.

    8 months ago
  4. I had to post a disagreement, not because the idea is entirely bad, but I do think there should be some hesitation to require too much training. You are talking about volunteers that are not part of the professional response infrastructure.

    Best case scenario, yes, you would like to have everyone trained to the hilt with a broad-spectrum of skill-sets. But reality is, especially in the private sector, you'll be dealing with specialists and not generalists for the most part. Sysadmins are going to have different skill sets than Network Technicans, and Social Media management requires a, shall we say, finess and filter that is not always common in the depths of the tech world. Someone working on setting up a quick network to provide a command post with connectivity is not going to necessarily need PIO skills of someone managing social media.

    Base limits of training must focus around the barebones. The minimum someone would need to interface with Emergency Management in a tech capacity, do it well, without subjecting the rest of the responder pool to unnecessary risks or failures. From there, fitting the individuals into roles based on their skills, certifications, degrees, and training will be needed.

    -

    Brad,

    Englewood, CO CERT Member

    Former Red Cross DAT Member

    Microsoft Certified Professional

    8 months ago
    1. This is a very pragmatic view which I agree with. I'd add that tech teams should get basic training and take additional training based on needs assessments compiled after exercises/deployments. If they're serious about supporting response they should start by volunteering for exercises. Let the folks reviewing the exercise tell you what training you should be focusing on. Build on this through additional exercises and/or deployments.

      8 months ago
  5. NIMS Compliance Metrics Terms of Reference

    Personnel: Paid and volunteer staff who meet required qualification and certification standards necessary to perform assigned missions and tasks.

    The categories for each level of training have been simplified from those that were in the Five-Year NIMS Training Plan. Training recommendations are now based upon the level of an incident’s complexity (Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program) that a person may become involved in, from Type 1 to Type 5. Organizations should consider the complexity of incidents that their jurisdictions are most likely to face and tailor the NIMS training for their personnel to meet those needs.

    • Resource Descriptions. Major resources—including personnel, facilities, and major equipment

    and supply items—used to support incident management activities are given common names and are "typed" with respect to their capabilities, to help avoid confusion and to enhance interoperability.

    • Position Titles. At each level within the ICS organization, individuals with primary responsibility

    have distinct titles. Titles provide a common standard for all users, and also make it easier to fill

    ICS positions with qualified personnel. ICS titles often do not correspond to the titles used on a

    daily basis.

    • Unique ICS position title and organizational structures are used. There is no correlation with the administrative structure of any other agency or jurisdiction. This organization’s uniqueness helps to avoid confusion over different position titles and organizational structures.

    • Rank may change. Someone who serves as a chief every day may not hold that title when deployed under an ICS structure. ICS positions depend on a combination of training and experience.

    It is recommended that key executives and administrators of NGOs use NIMS for planned events or incidents, because its use improves the organizations’ ability to integrate into incident management. While compliance with NIMS is not mandated for NGOs, adhering to NIMS procedures and terminology, and requiring staff with disaster-related missions to take appropriate training, will support the continued integration of the NGOs into a jurisdiction’s preparedness efforts.

    Organizations utilizing volunteers, especially spontaneous volunteers, are responsible for ensuring each volunteer’s eligibility to participate in a response. These organizations—governmental agencies responsible for coordinating emergency responses, volunteer management agencies (e.g., Red Cross, Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals, Medical Reserve Corps, etc.), and other potential users of volunteers (e.g., hospitals, fire and police departments, etc.)—must develop protocols governing the activation and use of volunteers. Careful coordination is required to ensure the provision of services is not hindered by unaddressed safety and security considerations or legal or regulatory issues.

    8 months ago
  6. I completely agree Eric.

    8 months ago
  7. DISAGREEMENT:

    1)"You are talking about volunteers that are not part of the professional response infrastructure".

    2)"Someone working on setting up a quick network to provide a command post with connectivity is not going to necessarily need PIO skills of someone managing social media".

    3)"Base limits of training must focus around the barebones".

    4) "Build on this through additional exercises and/or deployments".

    RESPONSE:

    1)Personnel: Paid and volunteer staff who meet required qualification and certification standards necessary to perform assigned missions and tasks.To lead the development of training and exercises that further appropriate agencies’ and organizations’ knowledge, adoption, and implementation of NIMS, the NIC will coordinate with them to do the following:The review and recommendation (in coordination with Federal, State, tribal, local, nongovernmental, private-sector, and national professional organizations) of discipline-specific NIMS training courses.NIMS publication management includes the following types of products:Qualifications information, Training course and exercise information, Task books.

    2) QUICK NETWORK-COLD,WARM, or HOT? Warm Site – A continuity facility that is equipped with some hardware, and communications interfaces, electrical and environmental conditioning which is capable of providing backup after additional provisioning, software or customization is performed.Hot Site – A continuity facility that already has in place the computer, telecommunications, and environmental infrastructure required to recover critical business functions or information systems. Hence, this participant will argue for the 'HOT-SITE'.

    3)BAREBONES? Again, this is flawed. FEMA/NIC sets the standards for qualification of responders and emergency management not an exercise evaluator. The standard is:Training recommendations are now based upon the level of an incident’s complexity (Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program) that a person may become involved in, from Type 1 to Type 5. Organizations should consider the complexity of incidents that their jurisdictions are most likely to face and tailor the NIMS training for their personnel to meet those needs.

    4) Build on this through additional exercises and/or deployments? Hardly-! NIMS defines the preparedness cycle as “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” Exercises play an important role in this broad preparedness cycle. A capability is provided with proper planning, organization, training, equipment, and exercises. The capability elements define the resources needed to perform the critical tasks to the specified levels of performance, with the recognition that there is rarely a single combination of capability elements that must be used to achieve a capability.Performance activities and tasks are the actions taken to prevent, protect against, respond to, or recover from an actual event or are demonstrated during an xercise.Performance measures are quantitative or qualitative levels against which achievement of a task or capability outcome can be assessed. They describe how much, how well, or how quickly an action should be performed and are typically expressed in ways that can be observed during an exercise or real event.Plans, training, and equipment, and the capabilities they represent, are validated through exercises. Exercise evaluation informs preparedness priorities by highlighting potential preparedness shortfalls in the areas of planning, organization, training, and equipment prior to real-world incidents.

    ARGUING AND ADVOCATION OF CAPABILITIES AND GRANT FUNDS

    This participant will advocate for sustainment of your grant funds under both EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS (EMPG) PROGRAM and HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT PROGRAM (HSGP). To that extent, quartely improvement and reports pertaining thereto are required to demonstrate improvements in NIMS PERSONNEL RESOURCE TYPING, COOP, and CITIZEN CORPS CAPABILITIES. Exception must be taken to, "You are talking about volunteers that are not part of the professional response infrastructure", since it implies two groupings (THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISE vs. THE OTHERS)and the reality is that of the whole EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COMMUNITY based on a national set of doctrines, concepts, principles, terminology, and organizational processes that enables effective, efficient, and collaborative incident management. To that extent, "BAREBONES" fractures qualified 'UNITY-OF-COMMAND' and frustrates 'SPAN-OF-CONTROL'. TIER-II, TYPE-IV/V is "BAREBONES" and hardly enough to satify EOP requirements of COMPLEX-UNIFIED-COMMAND situations protrayed in many jurisdictional EOPs for TYPE-I,II, and III incidents. Simply, keeping P-P-Ps, NOVADs,VOADs, and in-house volunteers as qualified TYPE-IV/V does not satisfy our overall improvent reporting for the grants and is a constraint/impediment to effective 'DISASTER-RESPONSE'.

    tarantino4me and jon_nakapalau are absolutely correct.Objective Four: Target Training and Verify Capability of Personnel (EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PERFORMANCE GRANTS (EMPG) PROGRAM). Here we discover that NIMS Training: IS 100; IS 200; IS 700; and IS 800; FEMA Professional Development Series: IS 120; IS 230; IS 235; IS 240; IS 241; IS 242; and IS 244 is a grant performance requirement.

    "Best case scenario, yes, you would like to have everyone trained to the hilt with a broad-spectrum of skill-sets. But reality is, especially in the private sector(NIPP), you'll be dealing with specialists and not generalists for the most part". "If they're serious about supporting response they should start by volunteering for exercises". Very doubtful, "Certain exercise-related information from private sector partners may require or be eligible for additional protections under the Protective Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) Program. Established pursuant to the Critical Infrastructure Information (CII) Act of 2002, the PCII Program is an information-protection tool that enables members of the private sector to submit proprietary, confidential, or sensitive infrastructure information to DHS with the assurance that the information will be protected from public disclosure. Under the PCII Program, information that satisfies the requirements of the CII Act of 2002 is protected from public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), State and local disclosure laws, and use in civil litigation. DHS and other Federal, State, and local analysts use PCII in pursuit of a more secure homeland, focusing primarily on analyzing and securing critical infrastructure and protected systems, identifying vulnerabilities and developing risk assessments, and enhancing recovery preparedness measures". No nned to know- You don't know when the exercise is conducted. Hence, this participant will argue and advocate for 'WHOLE COMMUNITY' capabilities progressive improvement and grants sustainment and enhancement measures.

    8 months ago
  8. mjcyranwd6alm, your responses are poorly formatted and difficult to read, please try to use proper paragraphing to promote readability, and limit the use of all caps.

    Response to your response:

    1) Volunteers are expected to have a certain level of training and are expected to maintain that training level, if not exceeding it. Hence why we are discussing minimum training criteria, the baseline. However, it must be kept in mind that volunteers have responsibilities outside of the disaster response infrastructure, and are not involved in it on a day-to-day basis. As such, we have to determine what that baseline training should be, what is appropriate, and what is 'nice to have'. This is what separates someone who is a Network Administrator for a private company 5-days a week versus someone who is responding to a disaster possibly once a year: if you set the training requirements too high, you will not have enough volunteers capable of supporting the mission. If you set it too low, you will have the opposite effect.

    I would suggest placing all training and/or certifications into categories: critical, recommended, and 'nice-to-have'/optional. Critical training is the barrier to participation. Recommended is what is needed to maintain good standing after a period of time. Optional is what is needed to advance.

    2) Yes, I know the differences in various site capabilities. The point being someone capable of getting a network up and running (whether it is cold, warm, hot, etc.) has that skill set, which will be different from someone who is expected to help the PIO with social media. It is the same as asking a police officer to have the same skill set as a alpine rescuer and vice versa. One will know ropes rescue, one can put a man down at 40 yards, the likelihood of finding both in an individual is marginal.

    3) You misinterpret my comment, please see my response to #1.

    4) Every position in every organization has an entry-level set of qualifications. This is what myself and John are speaking of here. Define the entry-level qualifications, and from there outline training that complements that entry level set of qualifications.

    mjcyranwd6alm, would you mind posting a bit about your qualifications? I suspect the miscommunication comes from what side of the discussion we are on. I suspect you're more on the OEM side, considering your extensive knowledge. I, on the other hand, am the target audience: Information Technology professionals working with private organizations which have a disaster response team already in place and a desire to serve in the public interest.

    - Brad

    7 months ago
  9. QUALIFICATIONS? Personnel who serve on complex multijurisdictional incidents nationwide (incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the NIMS Credentialing Program will be required to have qualifications that meet these guidelines; the guidelines are recommended for service on all incidents.

    1-Personnel Qualifications is a term to denote incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Credentialing Program.

    2-The categories for each level of training have been simplified from those that were in the Five-Year NIMS Training Plan. Training recommendations are now based upon the level of an incident’s complexity (Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program) that a person may become involved in, from Type 1 to Type 5. Organizations should consider the complexity of incidents that their jurisdictions are most likely to face and tailor the NIMS training for their personnel to meet those needs.

    The NIMS Training Program defines the national NIMS training program as it relates to the NIMS components of Preparedness, Communications and Information Management, Resource Management, and Command and Management. It specifies NIC and stakeholder responsibilities and activities for developing, maintaining, and sustaining NIMS training.

    3-The NIC and NIMS stakeholders share responsibility for ensuring the success of the national NIMS training program.

    www.training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/IS/ICSResource/index.htm

    4-The Communications Unit is responsible for planning the use of radio frequencies; establishing networks for command, tactical, support, and air units; setting up on-scene telephone and public address equipment; and providing any required off-incident communication links.

    IT is a function of the 'COMMUNICATIONS UNIT' and is within the purview of the 'COMMUNICATIONS UNIT' and the assigned 'COMMUNICATIONS UNIT LEADER'(COML) and 'COMMUNICATIONS TECHNICIAN'(COMT). The ‘COMMUNICATIONS UNIT' is responsible to provide all communication in the field, EOCs, ECCs, MACs,etc. including IT. This includes inter-agency/inter-jurisdiction interoperable communications [Communications interoperability is the ability of public safety agencies (police, fire, EMS) and service agencies (public works, transportation, hospitals, etc.) to talk within and across agencies and jurisdictions via radio and associated communications systems, exchanging voice, data and/or video with one another on demand, in real time, when needed, and when authorized. It is essential that public safety has the interagency operability it needs, and that it builds its systems toward interoperability.]

    While NIMS specifies separate qualifications for field vs. EOCs this does not relive communications unit personnel from cross-training/dual qualification and ongoing training and qualification to perform multiple tasks and duties of voice, data, and video establishing 'CONTINUITY OF COMMUNICATIONS' which requires primary with alternate facilities to maintain a common operating picture, interoperability, reliability, scalability, portability, resiliency, and redundancy. The communications resources at the alternate facility must be sufficient to enable performance of all essential functions. This includes providing sufficient quantity and mode/media to allow for effective interaction with other agency elements (e.g., regional offices), other agencies, stakeholders and other recipients of the agency’s essential functions or services, and other government and private sector organizations (including key operations centers) critical to the performance of that agency’s essential functions. Secure and non-secure communications requirements should be incorporated, as applicable. Obviously, this does not include set-ups within ‘COLD-FACILITIES’ with incompatible software by ‘TECHNICAL-SPECIALISTS’ on copper or fiber without alternate transmission mediums. Hence, the existence and deployment of trained ‘EMERGENCT RESPONSE GROUP’ (ERGs) vs. ‘TECHNICAL-SPECIALISTS’. Plans, training, and equipment, and the capabilities they represent, are validated through exercises not off specification-sheets or wall-paper.

    7 months ago

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