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Taking Action: Creating Model Emergency Management Plans for Schools, Institutions of Higher Education and Houses of Worship »

Coordination between agencies and position funding

In New Hampshire we have a law and rule in place that requires all public and nonpublic schools and childcare programs to have an Emergency Response Plan in place that utilize the Incident Command System and seven standardized Response Actions. One advantage of this is that children entering kindergarten are already familiar with Lockdown, Reverse Evacuation, Secure Campus and the other Response Actions. Planning guidance and trainings are coordinated with the Dept of Health, Office of the State Fire Marshal, State Police and the Dept of Education with Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM) as the lead agency. The same management organization may benefit Federal activities. Also it is advisable to include childcare in all Federal school emergency planning activities.

In NH we have one point of contact for all School and Childcare emergency planning activities located in HSEM. We suggest that Federal dollars might be better utilized supporting a similar position within emergency management agencies in all 50 states as is currently done for many emergency management positions. Doing so would aid in coordinating national programs and greatly facilitate and improve information sharing; such as training techniques, security audit and planning guidance.

Submitted by gregg.champlin 1 year ago

Comments (6)

  1. Disagree, mainly because: what other response actions? where are these seven standardized response actions listed/defined?

    1 year ago
    1. gregg.champlin Idea Submitter

      Though not the primary thrust of this posting (it was meant as an example of the continuity of the program between K-12 and Childcare)... the 7 NH Response Actions are: Reverse Evacuation, Shelter-In-Place, Drop and Cover, Scan, Evacuation (Building and Offsite), Lockdown and Secure Campus.

      1 year ago
  2. Excuse me !!! That kind of thing. When do hazard and associated risks become that same in all 50 states?

    Accordingly, it follows that New Hampshire is not afflicted

    with the summer hazards and risks of Northern Alaska. Using New Hampshire as the template for all appears to be out of balance. If it is possible to validate the proposal, then the suggestion should be directed to FEMA/NIC for inclusion into NIMS as part of their 2 year revision procedure.

    1 year ago
  3. That sounds great for an earthquake. New Hampshire ? Maybe in the future. When we do not know. It is not a matter of when it will happen but when and how. Bout have earthquakes really been a 'BIG TICKET ITEM' in New Hampshire.

    In the event of an active shooter situation:

    Evacuate, Attempt to evacuate. Have an escape route and plan Leave your belongings Keep your hands visible, HideFind a place to hide Block entry and lock doors, Remain quiet and silence your cell phone or pager, Take ActionAs a last resort, try to incapacitate the shooter Act with physical aggression, Remember to always: Take note of the two nearest exits in any facility you visit. Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers. CALL 911 WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO!

    1 year ago
    1. gregg.champlin Idea Submitter

      Honestly I'm not following your discussion.

      i agree hazards are not the same in all states, in fact they may not be the same for all schools in the same district. I beleive I mentioned I don't like templates and we don't have one in NH... each plan is developed by the district which we (the state) facilitate. The use of ICS/NIMS is manditory for all schools and childcare. And we pretty much instruct our schools on the method you staed in responding to an intruder.

      1 year ago
  4. In New Hampshire we have a law and rule in place that requires all public and nonpublic schools and childcare programs to have an Emergency Response Plan in place that utilize the Incident Command System and seven standardized Response Actions. Isn't the very premise of the posting New Hampshire has this procedure, it works great, all should adopt and implement the New Hampshire procedure? Maybe not in Arizona and Colorado.

    As shocking as it may seem Arizona and Colorado have tight grip on this venue with schools and don't need to do any grandstanding. With many public schools and public school districts that purport to have adopted NIMS/ICS doctrines, concepts, principles, terminology, and organizational processes there appears to be a disconnect and departure from qualified 'UNITY OF COMMAND' and 'SPAN OF CONTROL'. The NIC developed and maintains NIMS Compliance Assistance Support Tool (NIMSCAST) as the premier self-assessment instrument for Federal, State, territorial, tribal, and local jurisdictions to evaluate and report achievement of NIMS implementation objectives (activities). NIMSCAST reflects implementation objectives and metrics in support of national preparedness goals, including standards for preparedness assessments and strategies and a system for assessing the Nation's overall ability to prepare for all-hazards incident management. It is here, on the NIMSCAST ROLL-OUT, where some individuals start noticing the factors of 'UNITY OF COMMAND' and 'SPAN OF CONTROL', and training to position of planners, trainers, first responders, command and general staff. Hypothetically, assuming but not concluding a school planner that produces an EOP (plan) should have training at the very least in;

    • IS-1: Emergency Manager: An Orientation to the Position

    • IS-100.a: Introduction to Incident Command System, I-100

    • IS-130: Exercise Evaluation and Improvement Planning

    • IS-200.a: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents

    • IS-208: State Disaster Management

    • IS-230: Principles of Emergency Management

    • IS-235: Emergency Planning

    • IS-288: The Role of Voluntary Agencies in Emergency Management

    • IS-292: Disaster Basics

    • IS-547: Introduction to Continuity of Operations (COOP)

    • IS-700.a: National Incident Management System (NIMS), An Introduction

    • IS-701: NIMS Multiagency Coordination Systems

    • IS-702: NIMS Public Information Systems

    • IS-703: NIMS Resource Management

    • IS-706: NIMS Intrastate Mutual Aid – An Introduction

    • IS-800.b: National Response Framework, An Introduction

    • IS-860: Introduction to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan

    Not in all but a majority of cases, what do you think we will find? Note that the aspect of NIMS ICS All-Hazards Position-Specific: Planning Section Chief (PSC) Course (E962) wasn’t previously mentioned. For the purposes of the NIMS Training Program, the term “emergency management” refers to all system/processes utilized to effectively manage incidents and events. “NIMS implementation” means that NIMS is institutionalized in a sustainable manner within every organization, agency, and jurisdiction in order to be effectively and efficiently used for emergency management and incident response activities. Personnel Qualifications is a term to denote incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Credentialing Program, also under development by the NIC. The categories for each level of training have been simplified from those that were in the Five-Year NIMS Training Plan. Training recommendations are now based upon the level of an incident’s complexity (Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program) that a person may become involved in, from Type 1 to Type 5.Organizations should consider the complexity of incidents that their jurisdictions are most likely to face and tailor the NIMS training for their personnel to meet those needs. Exception will also be taken to sole reliance to justify any achievement purely based upon the production of an AAR/IP written by that entity's (school) purported 'PLANNER/s'. Examination of the background materials (minutes, meeting sign-in sheets, and qualifications of planning team members) must all be taken into consideration. Do we have a 'COOKIE-CUTTER' AAR/IP? Are we looking at some school or school district that claims to have adopted and implemented NIMS/ICS and while technically so, as defined by Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program, is only trained at best to TYPE-4 and TYPE-5 conditions while their 'Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment defines NIMS TYPE 1, 2, and 3 conditions? Are we looking at the possibility or has it already happened that the school will or has deployed TYPE-4 and TYPE-5 resources to a TYPE-1, 2, or 3 incident events? Not only because of the reason stated by Russell Deffner, which is valid, but because of the reasons stated above, it would appear inappropriate to thought either the New Hampshire Statute, or the New Hampshire School Planning items as lessons learned, best practices, or the template to be adopted by all unless the posting is inclusive of the figures to support the achievement of the practice. Where are these seven standardized response actions listed/defined?

    If New Hampshire and their schools and school districts are to be the national icon template for all nationally and NIMS is the national convention, shouldn't we ask where in each and individual, with the State of New Hampshire isle 'Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment, the minutes and materials of a conducted Training and Exercise Plan Workshop (T&EPW), a Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan, a NIMSCAST ROLL-UP sheet reflective of training, exercise, and qualification to conditions of expressed within the 'Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment ? Where are these seven standardized response actions listed/defined? To comply with this new and improved state law has each and every school incorporated on their planning teams; Senior Official (elected or appointed)or designee, Emergency Manager or designee, EMS Director or designee, Fire Chief or designee, Police Chief or designee, Public Works Director or designee, Public Health Officer or designee, Hazardous Materials Coordinator, Hazard Mitigation Specialist, Transportation Director or designee, Agriculture Extension Service, School Superintendent or designee, Social services agency representatives, Local Federal asset representatives, NGOs (includes members of National VOAD [Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster]) and other private, not-for-profit,

    Faith-based, and community organizations, Local business and industry representatives, Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Utility representatives, Veterinarians/animal shelter representatives?

    Just because a state has a given NIMS/SCHOOL law does not mean that each and every school is complying with that law, does not mean the state is enforcing that law, and does not mean that any results are being achieved from the existence of that law.

    POSTED: "We suggest that Federal dollars might be better utilized supporting a similar position within emergency management agencies in all 50 states as is currently done for many emergency management positions. Doing so would aid in coordinating national programs and greatly facilitate and improve information sharing; such as training techniques, security audit and planning guidance”? Is that right? "We suggest"? Is another authorized by or a designated spokesman for the State of New Hampshire to speak the position for the State of New Hampshire? All 50 states? Are we hearing about the 'TEMPLATE-APPROACH'? Spend the money before the results are presented within the posting? At this time 2 participants have voted and 2 disagree possibly for separate reasons or some or all of the above. However, there is one common denominator of the disagreements are founded upon lack of information to support underlying elements of the posting.

    1 year ago

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