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Early Warning Severe Weather System

I have an idea that would save thousands of lives yearly across America. I have spoken to people at the NOAA, left messages to so many people on my solution for weather disaster and have gotten absolutely nowhere. I have the missing link to Severe Weather Early Warning System, and NO ONE will give me the time of day to hear it out. It will alert people while sleeping that a Tornado or similar is headed their way. They could be out in their yards, shopping, at work, sleeping, anywhere in ear shot of a building. It would give all Americans ample time to run for shelter. It would prevent many disasters, yet, no replies from anyone. This is a multiple system utilizing the NWS main frame computer and individual units in peoples homes and buildings. It would be a smoke detector type unit with a Tornado design to id it with a computer chip linked to the NWS computer. When people buy them they register the unique model number assigned to their building or home to the operator and their unit is assigned a zone. When zone Q is going to be involved the alarms in zone Q will be set off awaking sleeping people, alerting working people, shoppers, people in their yards or ear shot of the units and they have ample time to run for cover. Will I get a response from you? Anyone?

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Submitted by lifesaverware 2 years ago

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Comments (27)

  1. Interesting idea. . . How does this unit link to the NWS computer?. . .

    2 years ago
    1. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

      When you buy your unit, you call the NSW operator in charge of this and give her your units unique model number and the address you are installing it to. She then types that unit number and your address to the computer system. Your unit and address will be given a Zone from your State and area. A Computer programmer would assign the zones for each state. Once plugged into the main frame, the computer would set off all alarms in your zone when you are about to be hit.

      2 years ago
    2. But how does it link -- wired, WiFi, 3G, or something else?. . .

      2 years ago
    3. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

      Hi Mike. Sorry I did not answer that properly for you. I am an idea person and problem solver, however computer programming is beyond my realm. It would be up to the programmer to decide how to link it. Do you have any suggestions?

      2 years ago
    4. Alarm can be connected in a number of ways. . . A few I can think of:

      1. Thru a hard-line phone system (like my ADT system at home is). . .

      2. Thru a WiFi network -- but that requires jhomeowner to subscribe to an internet system. . .

      3. Thru a 3G-like network -- again subscription required. . .

      4. Thru a proprietary network service -- I have a programmable thremostat that is linked to the internet and to my power provider thru a private network that actually runs on the wiring in my house; no cost to me as a customer of the electric company. . .

      2 years ago
  2. The reverse 911 system, for phones and cell phones, would seem to already provide the kind of alert system you are seeking. I believe your system is not needed, and may be too complex/ costly in any event.

    2 years ago
    1. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

      What about those who do not have cell phones. Or they are off and charging. They wouldn't answer them when they are sleeping. The cost would be to the people of buying the unit for the same price of a smoke detector around $10.00 and then just having an employee at the NWS take care of the programming, and the operator to add unit numbers to addresses, then very minimal from there. These would end up being in every home and building across the US like our smoke detectors and CO2 detectors are now. These you would hear outside in the yards or pools and would definitely wake you up from sleep. By the way, I do have a cell phone but do not get any alerts on it. My elderly parents do not have one, nor do many people I know. What good is that system then? You say this type of system is not needed? Then why are people still dying in their beds when Tornadoes rip through in the middle of the night? If my system was up and running, they would have been awoken and ran for shelter.

      2 years ago
    2. I am in a Code Red county and our system works on landlines, cellphones and VOIP systems (Vonage, etc.). Most people have at least one of these.

      2 years ago
  3. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    I see someone does not like this idea. What is there about it not to like? I am great at troubleshooting and if there is something about it that could be done better, I am all ears.

    2 years ago
    1. Is this something like a weather radio?. . . We seem to get a lot of alerts that don't apply to us. . . Sometimes so many, that we're tempted to turn it off. . .

      2 years ago
  4. Knowledge and Preparedness...

    Just having knowledge is not being prepared, and being properly prepared is useless if you have no warning of potential events.

    Sure, a device that is zone specific would be an addition to being informed...but so would having a weather radio with the "Alert" switch actually turned on. Depending on your location, most people buy a weather radio, unpack it, plug it in, put the battery in, and turn the alert switch on... only to turn it off again in about three days when they get tired of the "Little man in the box" sounding off at three in the morning, alerting you that there is a "potential for high winds"

    The population in general has become apathetic to their situational awareness. they rely too much on one mouse click to gain information AS THEY NEED IT, rather than checking things beforehand and knowing what is heading their way even a day or two in advance. This leads to the topic of reaction time. getting a warning early enough is what saves lives, not a warning a minute before the event.

    It all comes down to people taking the self responsibility to know what is happening, or has the potential of happening at any time around them. it is an ongoing effort that has sadly been replaced many times by modern technology, and is counter productive.

    Fifty years ago, a farmer in the field could predict the weather days out, because his lively hood depended on it. He did not need a warning over the radio. Sadly this level of awareness has fallen short, and the general assumption is that it is someone else's responsibility to inform.

    2 years ago
  5. I like the idea, but it's one thing to be forewarned, quite another if there isn't adequate shelter in place where people can evacuate to.

    You might want to consider pitching this idea to Texas Tech University Wind Science and Engineering Research Center and see if they can do anything about it.

    2 years ago
    1. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

      Great direction to send me to. Thank you. I agree that everyone needs a safe shelter and should have one in place. I know not everyone has a cellar or basement. For those who do, this is a great concept. For those who do not, they need to put one in place.

      2 years ago
  6. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    Mike not like a radio. Like a Smoke detector. Picture this. You are in bed sleeping. An F5 is coming your way and your house is in the path. Today, you would get nailed by it and possibly loose your life as well as your families and be on the news for 3 days. With this system, you would have been woken up from your sleep as well as your family, and in the cellar or wherever in time.

    Creativeogre, I agree to a degree. Yes shame on us. We have forgotten how to survive in our ever changing planet without the assistance of continuously changing technology. I live in New England. I don't know if you heard but we got nailed by back to back F4-F5s with no warning. We were lucky when it came to human casualty, however these flattened many towns as they ripped through. One man told me, he was in his kitchen heard a train, looked out the window, and saw trees flying, he ran to his cellar just as he reached the second step his house got ripped away as he watched his fridge and walls disappear. Just one small story to you, but, thing is if we had these alarms going off, we would all have been warned and known it was coming and ran for cover.

    2 years ago
    1. I understand the alarm part. . .

      But how does the device get know to sound the alarm; how is it connected to the network warning system?. . .

      With a smoke / CO2 alarm it's easy -- a detector senses / triggers an alarm. . .

      2 years ago
  7. Lifesaverware, you have an excellent idea here. In today's technology world, there has to be something we can do to make this happen. Maybe limit the device to only go off if a potential natural disaster is within 5 miles of your location.

    However maybe a new device is not the answer. Today everyone has a cell phone, maybe we should be looking for someone to develop a "app" that you install on your phone to alert you to a situation within 5 miles. Give it a very obnoxious ring tone so it wakes you up to figure what is going on.

    2 years ago
  8. We already have the NOAA Weather Radios with SAME Capability. The user is able to program the County Code and partial coverage area if they wish. A user also has the capability to set the specific alerts they wish to receive.

    I see the need to include SAME Capable WX Alerts in a variety of devices, but not really a need to repace a system that works.

    2 years ago
  9. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    @ Common Sense Preparedness, I rejected a cell phone idea early on as I thought deeply into it as being a solution, I felt it was not because I still know many people who do not own cell phones, especially the elderly. Also, not everyone who does have one, has a cell with capabilities for aps. Also, when phones are off and charging or dead or misplaced these people still would not know. I am concerned to have EVERYONE alerted, not just those who have new technology. And with my idea the only units that would be going off would absolutely be the homes and business in the path of the storm. Now, I am curious, did I make you think twice about a cell phone ap?

    2 years ago
    1. How is your idea NOT new technology? You admit you have no idea HOW these inexpensive(?) devices would receive data to sound an alert. Smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors are self-contained units that do NOT require receiving information from a remote location to function. You are advocating creating a new network or using existing networks that don't service everyone (for a variety of reasons). Regarding cell phones being "off and charging or dead...", wouldn't your device have to have the battery changed regularly? Does everyone do that with smoke detectors now?

      2 years ago
  10. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    @ ryan.kelzenberg, My idea is NOT to replace the old system but to add to it and enhance it as a missing link in upgrading the system that has been in place. I have never heard of a weather radio. I live on the East Coast and nobody I know has ever mentioned one of these so what good are they to those of us who do not have one? Also, the elderly probably would not be able to figure out how to program one. Our system we have right now does not work. People are still dying in their beds while twisters attack in the night. We had a few odd F5s hit us a few months ago with absolutely NO warning. Many towns were devastated and none of us knew it was coming. Just an example here. If we had this system idea in place we ALL would have known and would have had time to run for shelter.

    2 years ago
    1. If you have never heard of a weather radio, then you have not adequately researched existing solutions to the problem.

      2 years ago
  11. The NWS radio network is supposed to offer reasonably good coverage nationwide. I wonder where on the East Coast you live that you can't receive it? Did you try going to http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/nwrbro.htm and checking for coverage?

    2 years ago
  12. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    Alarm can be connected in a number of ways. . . A few sent to me is: 1. Thru a hard-line phone system (like ADT system at home is) however not a good option as phones will be down once it hits. . . 2. Thru a WiFi network -- but that requires homeowner to subscribe to an internet system. . . 3. Thru a 3G-like network -- again subscription required. . . 4. Thru a proprietary network service -- Someone I have met has a programmable thremostat that is linked to the internet and to his power provider thru a private network that actually runs on the wiring in his house; no cost to customers of the electric company. . .If we can get that computer chip in the units to be signaled by auto response from main frame to set it off, we would be all set. Ps. I am just trying to help so Please stop the angry hate messages.

    2 years ago
    1. Wow!

      "angry hate messages"? Really?

      When you mention "computer chip" and "main frame" you seem to think there is some magic connection between devices. Some folks in this thread are trying to point out the practical limitations of existing technologies. When the power and phone lines are out, pretty much everything else in the house except battery-backed devices are out as well. No internet, no wi-fi, no landlines. So, the question remains, what is the communication mechanism that gets the alert from a central location to these devices (and I don't think they'll be cheap, either). That seems to be the biggest hurdle in this proposal. Something like the auto makers have (OnStar is one brand) might be what you're looking for, but it won't be cheap and would require a subscription fee.

      Unless your solution involves magic, please think about (or research) existing communication technologies.

      2 years ago
  13. Does anyone have a NWS S.A.M.E. radio?

    2 years ago
  14. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    This warning system can work similar to how the ADT system works. All signals released from the NWC to the individual units in the path of the storm. Linked the in a similar fashion.

    2 years ago
  15. lifesaverware Idea Submitter

    As this product idea has been debated and discussed 100s of more people have died in their beds again. Can't we give this technology a chance to see if we can decrease these numbers?

    1 year ago