I agree to Idea Get our schools prepared
Voting Disabled
I disagree to Idea Get our schools prepared

Rank 485

Idea#1202

This idea is active.
Taking Action: Creating Model Emergency Management Plans for Schools, Institutions of Higher Education and Houses of Worship »

Get our schools prepared

I think EVERY school should have plans in place for a variety of situations that can happen. Whether it's a shooter, earthquake or fire. Every school should have a plan to keep the kids safe. I think we should have some staff and teachers carrying Tasers. We should have food and water in the classroom in case it is on lock down for a long period of time.

Submitted by 1 year ago

Comments (15)

  1. I certainly agree that an all-hazard school plan is the right way to go. It should be consistent and coordinated with the city or county all-hazards emergency operations plan (EOP). It makes sense to follow a similar planning process to the CPG-101 process those EOP's should have been developed with.

    I don't know about Taser's specifically and supplies in the classroom for extended lockdowns. However, I do believe in general that the plans should be tailored to the risk profile for the school and community. A lot of that information should have already been developed by the local emergency management agency. Some might argue, but in my mind, a plan is incomplete if it does not consider three types of protective actions for staff and students: evacuation, shelter (which would include lockdowns for certain scenarios), and active response/defense. During planning, decision-making criteria for implementing each can be debated and carefully laid out so "heat of the moment" decisions regarding how best to protect people can be made more quickly based on pre-determined essential elements of information.

    After those plans are in place, as noted in other posts, all those with responsibility for implementing the plan need to be trained on the actions required of them and then exercised to test the plan and training.

    1 year ago
  2. Every school is different and needs a dedicated staff to address its needs and issues, all teachers are not good security, or good teachers. They need professional staff that is dedicated to the task the staff needs to be paid the program needs to be funded.

    1 year ago
  3. It should very EZ to harden 1 or 2 large rooms with a store a food & water to face any emgencey. In addition to running 3 times a year.

    1 year ago
    1. Our schools are merging, and there are no more rooms... the "spare" rooms, including storage rooms, cafeteria... are all used as classroom space (this is most of NYS).

      1 year ago
  4. Think, believe, or know ? To ensure that stakeholders implement NIMS, the NIC evaluates implementation using NIMS Compliance Objectives (requirements). These compliance objectives are regulated at the organizational or jurisdictional level, and Federal policy requires jurisdictions and organizations to meet NIMS compliance requirements as a condition for receiving Federal preparedness assistance (through grants, contracts, and other activities). The NIMS compliance objectives for training typically require that stakeholders are providing their personnel with appropriate NIMS training.The categories for each level of training have been simplified from those that were in the Five-Year NIMS Training Plan. Training recommendations are now based upon the level of an incident’s complexity (Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program) that a person may become involved in, from Type 1 to Type 5. Organizations should consider the complexity of incidents that their jurisdictions are most likely to face and tailor the NIMS training for their personnel to meet those needs. Five major components make up the NIMS system approach: Preparedness: Effective emergency management and incident response activities begin with a host of preparedness activities conducted on an ongoing basis, in advance of any potential incident. Preparedness involves an integrated combination of assessment; planning; procedures and

    protocols; training and exercises; personnel qualifications, licensure, and certification; equipment certification; and evaluation and revision.

     Communications and Information Management: Emergency

    management and incident response activities rely on communications and information systems that provide a common operating picture to all command and coordination sites. NIMS describes the requirements necessary for a standardized framework for communications and emphasizes the need for a common operating picture. This component is based on the concepts of interoperability, reliability, scalability, and portability, as well as the resiliency and redundancy of communications and information systems.

     Resource Management: Resources (such as personnel, equipment, or supplies) are needed to support critical incident objectives. The flow of resources must be fluid and adaptable to the requirements of the incident.

    NIMS defines standardized mechanisms and establishes the resource management process to identify requirements, order and acquire, mobilize,track and report, recover and demobilize, reimburse, and inventory

    resources.

     Command and Management: The Command and Management

    component of NIMS is designed to enable effective and efficient incident management and coordination by providing a flexible, standardized incident management structure. The structure is based on three key organizational constructs: the Incident Command System, Multiagency Coordination Systems, and Public Information.

     Ongoing Management and Maintenance: Within the auspices of Ongoing Management and Maintenance, there are two components: the Integration Center (NIC) and Supporting Technologies.

    1 year ago
  5. Teachers should not be carrying tasers.

    1 year ago
  6. jcf 1951 fails to make a distinction between an emergency and a disaster. Disaster: An occurrence of a natural catastrophe, technological accident, or human-caused event that has resulted in severe property damage, deaths, and/or multiple injuries. As used in this Guide, a “large-scale disaster” is one that exceeds the response capability

    of the Local jurisdiction and requires State, and potentially Federal, involvement. As used in the Stafford Act, a “major disaster” is “any natural catastrophe [...] or, regardless of cause, any fire, flood, or explosion, in any part of the United States, which in the determination of the President causes damage of sufficient severity and magnitude to warrant major disaster assistance under [the]

    Act to supplement the efforts and available resources of States, local governments, and disaster relief organizations in alleviating the damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused thereby.” (Stafford Act, Sec. 102(2), 42 U.S.C. 5122(2)).

    Emergency: Any incident, whether natural or manmade, that requires responsive action to protect life or property. Under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, an emergency “means any occasion or instance for which, in the determination of the President, Federal assistance is needed to supplement State and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and to protect property and public health and safety, or to lessen or avert the threat of a catastrophe in any part of the United States” (Stafford

    Act, Sec. 102(1), 42 U.S.C. 5122(1)).

    Again, we are hearing of light-weight solutions to heay-weight incidents. May schools have 1,000 to 2,000 plus staff.

    Only harding several rooms at best will only afford protections of a few. The issue is always unauthorized entry and presence not the firearm. Any perpetrator can select a different device and method to extract the same or greater result. Accordingly, prohibiting unauthored entry is the core resolution. Solid doors requiring card-keys avoids an unauthorized individual breaking a glass window on a door to gain entrance. Conformance to building practices as mentioned within FEMA publications; 428,426, and 452 will go along way toward achieving the true objectives of; Prevention,Protection, Mitigation, Response, and Recovery.

    NIMS defines the preparedness cycle as “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” it would be novel to prepare a Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment, Training and Exercise Plan Workshop (T&EPW), Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan, and conduct multi-ajency/jurisdiction exercises on various scenarios of increasing complexity. Further, The categories for each level of training have been simplified from those that were in the Five-Year NIMS Training Plan. Training recommendations are now based upon the level of an incident’s complexity (Complexity Guide found on pages 16-17 of the NIMS Training Program) that a person may become involved in, from Type 1 to Type 5. Organizations should consider the complexity of incidents that their jurisdictions are most likely to face and tailor the NIMS training for their personnel to meet those needs.

    1 year ago
  7. In my opinion it has to do with training, in "sensitive areas" anyone carrying any 'weapon' [tazor, pepper spray, handgun, baton, ballistic vest] needs special training for operations in that kind of area.

    As to food and water I agree, but would stress water. Hydration is an under appreciated every day health issue anyway having a source in room even if only a water cooler will help.

    1 year ago
  8. Arizona is working a bill to arm at least one teacher in a school. This is overly reactionary, laws and structure vary around the USA so some of this may be foreign. In Az we have Reserve Peace Officers (fully trained and certified people, not posse or Gomer Pyle). School districts here are state subdivisions not municipal and can have a police agency (they are far too expensive even for non-university colleges). If I were to arm someone at a school (as part of a state DoE police force), it would not be a teacher, it would be an admin or staff member with irregular contact with students who can return to their office and retrieve proper police duty gear and id (being a "reserve") and respond to an incident. The 60 yo. school marm with a gun in her desk is as likely to be the one providing the weapon as not as such things do not remain secret. Limited or poor training such as basic ccw do not make a keeper of the peace and will often result in escalating a situation in a closed campus or house of worship where not everyone has parental escort or an frequent exits available to them. The maintenance man/DoE officer, is the first responder, intervene if possible limit the movement of assailant(s) (facilitating partial or complete evacuation) and be in radio contact with local PD. Such a person of irregular student contact will not have a class to lock down, and not have an office accessible by students under normal circumstances so a tall safe (gun safe) will not be a tempting target for mischief.

    Local and county PD having trained on the layout of a school need paper or digital box floor plans of every school to expedite clearing and evacuation of a facility. A combination of Entry in Force and covered evacuation can improve survivability of those caught in such situations as many schools are labyrinths a moving TOU that does not leave a secure and evacuated wake may be chasing someone in circles as the assailant shoots more people.

    I read somewhere in the posts of a group attempting to involve students in planning I like this. Training or mental conditioning is most important for preparedness for anything, beit a game or emergency. staff, students, and PS must be constantly in a state of mental scenario, if X happens at this spot and these variables exist I can do Y or Z...

    1 year ago
  9. AGREED: Arizona is working a bill to arm at least one teacher in a school. This is overly reactionary.

    COMMENT: All is not resolved between money, law and courts.

    The theory sounds fine and could be scripted for the movies.

    Armed or un-armed the individual with the firearm pointed at you is in control. Just even attempt to reach for your firearm and things will get irreversible real fast. Looking objectively we can't assume the flawed 'RESPONSIVE' approach outweighs the Prevention and Protection approaches and/or both. The issue is always unauthorized entry and presence not the firearm. Any perpetrator can select a different device and method to extract the same or greater result. Accordingly, prohibiting unauthorized entry is the core resolution. Solid doors requiring card-keys avoids an unauthorized individual breaking a glass window on a door to gain entrance. FEMA publications 428,426 and 452 address 'Buildings and Infrastructure Protection'. Would it not be prudent to explore the 'CORE-ISSUES'? Do we now, and only now, address responsive actions rather than that of MITIGATION, Prevention and Protection? It’s too political and emotional in the opinion circles created by the politicians and media. Does it really make a difference if the law passes or doesn't pass when the 'CORE-ISSUES' that are failing to be addressed are MITIGATION, Prevention and Protection activities? There is only one consideration to this proposed law and it would appear to be contrary to firearm safety practices. Firearms should not be around or accessible to children. They should be considered loaded at all times inspire of the owners claims. Accidents do happen.

    Unused firearms should be locked in a secure container and be unloaded and disassembled. Firearms should not be either in the proximity of children nor accessible to children in any event and no excuse is acceptable. Florida, Indiana, and Arizona have what currently appears to be reasonable firearm statutes and if the general public could reasonably assume the other individual/s were armed then others might think twice prior to attempting to compromise another/s life, liberty, and safety. However, firearms have no place in the proximity of minors and does represent a hazard an associated risk in a school building to the possibility of an innocent child being hit as a consequence of a responsive action.

    1 year ago
  10. Community Member Idea Submitter

    I guess I should be more specific when I posted originally. When I say I think "some" staff and teachers should carry a Taser, definitely did not mean all of them. I also, of course, meant with the proper training. I like Tasers because they are non-lethal and you do not need to be standing a arms reach away from them. Training is essential in preparing our schools for any emergency. Training both the staff and students can make all the difference if something should happen.

    1 year ago
    1. AGREED: I like Tasers because they are non-lethal and you do not need to be standing a arms reach away from them.

      Except that proper training is LE Tactical and not soccer mom training. The 4 hours on such weapons that some people might receive fail important areas such as sympathetic reflex. If a shooter is hold a gun on someone a has their finger on the trigger, an electrical shock from a Tazer or stun gun can and more often than not cause them to involuntarily pull the trigger where a bullet just below the end of the nose will drop the shooter like a sack of potatoes. That is why Hostage Rescue Teams and SWAT teams carry a combination of non-lethal and lethal solutions.

      I would go so far as to suggest that a non-lethal solution such as a Tazer is pointless without the ability to then mechanically restrain the shooter as the shock is only 5 seconds and continuous repeated shock is likely to cause death anyway. Also that is probable that the Tazer armed teacher is not going to make their one shot accurately under stress or under fire as an active shooter is well, shooting people, and the teacher does not have hundreds of hours of training and conditioning to prepare for the scenario.

      1 year ago
  11. In the event of an active shooter situation:

    Evacuate, Attempt to evacuate. Have an escape route and plan Leave your belongings Keep your hands visible, HideFind a place to hide Block entry and lock doors, Remain quiet and silence your cell phone or pager, Take ActionAs a last resort, try to incapacitate the shooter Act with physical aggression, Remember to always: Take note of the two nearest exits in any facility you visit. Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers. CALL 911 WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO!

    1 year ago
  12. I am currently working on a disaster plan that includes school disaster plans, and while searching on the internet I found a program called "I Love U Guys" that was developed by a parent who lost his daughter, Emily Keyes, in a school shooting at Platte Canyon High School in 2006. He named it "I Love U Guys," because that is what his daughter texted him before she was shot and killed. It provides a 3 step plan for children and teachers. It is simple enough to teach to children, yet effective.

    1 year ago
  13. NIMS represents a core set of doctrines, concepts, principles, terminology, and organizational processes that enables effective, efficient, and collaborative incident management. Incidents typically begin and end locally, and are managed on a daily basis at the lowest possible geographical, organizational, and jurisdictional level. A basic premise of both NIMS and the NRF is that incidents typically be managed at the local level first. In the vast majority of incidents, local resources and local mutual aid agreements and assistance agreements will provide the first line of emergency management and incident response. The responsibility for responding to incidents, both natural and manmade, begins at the local level – with individuals and public officials in the county, city, or town affected by the incident. Local leaders and emergency managers prepare their communities to manage incidents locally. The Framework’s response doctrine plays a key role in helping community leaders to coordinate resources within jurisdictions, among adjacent jurisdictions, and with the private sector and NGOs such as the American Red Cross.

    The NIMS Training Program outlines responsibilities and activities that are consistent with the National Training Program, as mandated by the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006.The training is intended for all personnel who are directly involved in emergency management and response. This includes all emergency services related disciplines such as EMS, hospitals, public health, fire service, law enforcement, public works/utilities, skilled support personnel, and other emergency management response, support and volunteer personnel.

    To ensure that stakeholders implement NIMS, the NIC evaluates implementation using NIMS Compliance Objectives (requirements). These compliance objectives are regulated at the organizational or jurisdictional level, and Federal policy requires jurisdictions and organizations to meet NIMS compliance requirements as a condition for receiving Federal preparedness assistance (through grants, contracts, and other activities). The NIMS compliance objectives for training typically require that stakeholders are providing their personnel with appropriate NIMS training.

    For the purposes of the NIMS Training Program, the term “emergency management” refers to all system/processes utilized to effectively manage incidents and events. “NIMS implementation” means that NIMS is institutionalized in a sustainable manner within every organization, agency, and jurisdiction in order to be effectively and efficiently used for emergency management and incident response activities.

    The NIC developed and maintains NIMS Compliance Assistance Support Tool (NIMSCAST) as the premier self-assessment instrument for Federal, State, territorial, tribal, and local jurisdictions to evaluate and report achievement of NIMS implementation objectives (activities). NIMSCAST reflects implementation objectives and metrics in support of national preparedness goals, including standards for preparedness assessments and strategies and a system for assessing the Nation's overall ability to prepare for all-hazards incident management.

    Let us attempt to use;

    Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 101,

    Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 502,

    Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 201,

    A Whole Community Approach to Emergency Management:

    Principles, Themes, and Pathways for Action FDOC 104-008-1 / December 2011,National Preparedness Goal

    First Edition September 2011,

    National Preparedness System November 2011,

    Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP). Also rolls and responsibilities are covered in

    National Incident Management System 2008 and

    National Response Framework 2008.

    RECCOMENDATION:: The following deliverable products be developed prior to proceeding with training for the school program;

    1- Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide

    2- EMERGENCY OPERATIONS PLAN (EOP)

    3- Training and Exercise Plan Workshop (T&EPW)

    4- Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan

    5- On-site staff be trained to deliever the required training; E427 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Program Manager, E428 Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) Train-the-Trainer (TTT), E449 Incident Command System (ICS) Curricula Train-the-Trainer (TTT), E550 Continuity of Operations (COOP) Planning Train-the-Trainer (TTT).

    PLANNING TEAM COMPOSITION: Senior Official (elected or appointed)or designee, Emergency Manager or designee, EMS Director or designee, Fire Chief or designee, Police Chief or designee, Public Works Director or designee, Public Health Officer or designee, Hazardous Materials Coordinator, Hazard Mitigation Specialist, Transportation Director or designee, Agriculture Extension Service, School Superintendent or designee, Social services agency representatives, Local Federal asset representatives, NGOs (includes members of National VOAD [Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster]) and other private, not-for-profit,

    Faith-based, and community organizations, Local business and industry representatives, Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Utility representatives, Veterinarians/animal shelter representatives?

    RECCOMENDATION: Hypothetically, assuming but not concluding a school planner that produces an EOP (plan) should have training at the very least in;

    • IS-1: Emergency Manager: An Orientation to the Position

    • IS-100.a: Introduction to Incident Command System, I-100

    • IS-130: Exercise Evaluation and Improvement Planning

    • IS-200.a: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents

    • IS-208: State Disaster Management

    • IS-230: Principles of Emergency Management

    • IS-235: Emergency Planning

    • IS-288: The Role of Voluntary Agencies in Emergency Management

    • IS-292: Disaster Basics

    • IS-547: Introduction to Continuity of Operations (COOP)

    • IS-700.a: National Incident Management System (NIMS), An Introduction

    • IS-701: NIMS Multiagency Coordination Systems

    • IS-702: NIMS Public Information Systems

    • IS-703: NIMS Resource Management

    • IS-706: NIMS Intrastate Mutual Aid – An Introduction

    • IS-800.b: National Response Framework, An Introduction

    • IS-860: Introduction to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan

    Acknowledging variances in laws, regulations, and ordinances within the various jurisdictions, it is generally against the law to block exist doors, block or wedge fire-doors, diable smoke detectors and fire-alarms, and smoke on any public property, smoke in any public building, or for minors to smoke. According it is generally unlaw for those to either permit or aid-and-abet such activities. The problem in this regard is that of school staff to manage and supervise the student-body and report unlawful activity on campus to local law enforcement authorities. According this lack of management, supervision, and control even includes failure to take measures to prohibit unauthorized entrance and presence on public school properties and buildings. All violations on public school properties need to be reported to local law enforcement immediately. Accordingly, there needs to be a zero tollerance policy in effect and practiced at all times. All students, parents, school staff, and the public need to be informed that any legal violation on public school property will be prosecuted to the full extent of the law.

    1 year ago

Vote Activity Show