I agree to Idea Identification of approved workers in a disaster
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Idea#1338

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Emergency Management, Healthcare and Public Health »

Identification of approved workers in a disaster

As I watched the terror unfold in Boston I was alarmed that the workers were just wearing simple yellow vests that can be bought at Walmart and the ID tags were on a variety of lariats with the photo ID facing the owners body rather than the public.Lariats can be bought anywhere and any ID added. I believe that a specific vest in a color, fabric and design should be provided and available after passing a background check and/OR a firefighter, nurse, Medic or MD status should be provided in order to prevent terrorists from infiltrating the site and causing even more casualties or removing paraphernalia that was used to cause the event. Any users who do not meet the above criteria and are found on site should be fined such as those impersonating a police officer. Realizing that this complicates things and even may prevent some persons from stepping in to help, there should be clauses in place for "other" parties to remove the injured from the scene that can avoid prosecution. Carrying an ID card or attaching information to a drivers license can be part of this procedure.

God bless America!

Submitted by 1 year ago

Comments (10)

  1. This subject is addressed within 'NIMS Guideline for the Credentialing of Personnel'. The Federal Government credential is known as a Personal Identity Verification (PIV) card. A credential issued by a non-federal authority that is designed to be interoperable with the federal PIV credential is known as a PIV-Interoperable (PIV-I) card. Both PIV and PIV-I use the same open technical standard: Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 201. The difference between PIV and PIV-I is that the PIV includes a type of background check that is unique to federal employees and contractors.

    1 year ago
    1. The problem with PIV is that even the federal government doesn't have the resources to issue FIPS compliant credentials to all appropriate federal employees. Existing federal IDs are almost all agency-specific variations, which are rarely fully compliant and there is zero support within the federal government either for actually implementing a single government-wide standard or for having any sort of cross-agency ID (despite both being inherent in FIPS 201). A military retiree or reservist, working for a federal contractor, and serving as an intermittent FEMA employee is already carrying three incompatible federal ID cards - none of which reflect his full credentials.

      1 year ago
  2. ANY standardized identification recognizable to the public can be easily forged. Unless we are going to devote at least 1/3 of our responder resources to maintaining a cadre of ID Checkers, there is no practical way to prevent such deception if it were attempted.

    The objective of the vests you noted is NOT to prevent fake responders, but to enable to public to find the responders.

    1 year ago
  3. Personnel qualification is closely related to credentialing, which is inherently a stakeholder responsibility. For personnel to be credentialed so they can serve in NIMS-defined positions on a complex multi-jurisdictional incident (incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Emergency Responder Credentialing System), a stakeholder’s credentialing system must meet the minimum personnel-qualification guidelines specified by the NIC.

    Each federal agency with responsibilities under the National Response Framework is required to ensure that incident management personnel, emergency response providers, and other personnel (including temporary personnel) and resources likely needed to respond to a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or other manmade disaster are credentialed and typed in accordance with 6 U.S.C. § 320. In addition, Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5 (HSPD-5), Management of Domestic Incidents, requires that the heads of federal departments and agencies adopt NIMS. DHS interprets these authorities to require agencies to ensure that their personnel are credentialed and typed according to these guidelines.

    DISAGREEMENT: Exception is taken to the comment of,"The problem with PIV is that even the federal government doesn't have the resources to issue FIPS compliant credentials to all appropriate federal employees". FEMA department heads do a great job in rendention of their duties and it is highly doubtful if any department heads are at variance of 6 U.S.C. § 320. Futher, excecption is taken to the comment of,"Existing federal IDs are almost all agency-specific variations, which are rarely fully compliant and there is zero support within the federal government either for actually implementing a single government-wide standard or for having any sort of cross-agency ID (despite both being inherent in FIPS 201)", since the uniform standard is Per 6 U.S.C. § 320, the FEMA Administrator is responsible for ensuring the development and implementation of credentialing of emergency response providers. 6 U.S.C. § 320, also calls on the Administrator to “provide standards” and “detailed written guidance” to:“Each federal agency that has responsibilities under the National Response Plan1 to aid that agency with credentialing and typing incident management personnel, emergency response providers, and other personnel (including temporary personnel) and resources likely needed to respond to a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or other man-made disaster; and state, local, and tribal governments, to aid such governments with credentialing and typing of state, local, and tribal incident management personnel, emergency response providers, and other personnel (including temporary personnel) and resources likely needed to respond to a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or other man-made disaster.” In addition, 6 U.S.C. § 320 requires the FEMA Administrator to provide expertise and technical assistance to:“…aid federal, state, local, and tribal government agencies with credentialing and typing incident management personnel, emergency response providers, and other personnel (including temporary personnel) and resources likely needed to respond to a natural disaster, act of terrorism, or other man-made disaster.” Required Federal Compliance: In accordance with HSPD-12, Policy for a Common Identification Standard for Federal Employees and Contractors, and FIPS 201, federal departments and agencies must identify their personnel who are likely to be deployed in accordance with assignments in the National Response Framework (NRF), National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP), or National Continuity Policy Implementation Plan (NCPIP). These personnel will be designated as FEROs, and their FIPS 201 credentials visually marked accordingly. Additionally, non-federal personnel assigned to work in federal offices will be credentialed in accordance with FIPS 201.

    The comments (claims) are not supported by specifics, verified situations,nor are individuals identifed who are federal employees that are not in compliance with U.S.C. § 320/FIPS 201.

    1 year ago
  4. mjcyranwd6alm you are welcome to disagree with the facts but that doesn't change those facts. I invite you to compare your FEMA PIV with the PIV of any military personnel, including the National Guard members you work alongside. Better yet ask one of your fellow FEMA employees who happens to be a military reservist to show you BOTH his PIV and explain why he needs both because neither carries the data that is required on the other. Under FIPS 201, all his relevant credentials ought to be combined in one PIV but that has not happened and no federal agency is willing to move from their agency standard to any single combined standard.

    1 year ago
  5. U.S.C. § 320/FIPS 201 is applicable to all federal agencies.

    1 year ago
  6. Were there reports or issues of "fake" responders in the incident? Is this actually a thing we are concerned with in that type of fast moving incident? Is this something you can actually do anything about at the national level?

    1 year ago
  7. Great questions. The credentialing process entails the objective evaluation and documentation of an individual’s current certification, license, or degree; training and experience; and competence or proficiency to meet nationally accepted standards, provide particular services and/or functions, or perform specific tasks under specific conditions during an incident. For the purpose of NIMS, credentialing is the administrative process for validating personnel qualifications and providing authorization to perform specific functions and to have specific access to an incident involving mutual aid. Organizations utilizing volunteers, especially spontaneous volunteers, are responsible for ensuring each volunteer’s eligibility to participate in a response. These organizations—governmental agencies responsible for coordinating emergency responses, volunteer management agencies (e.g., Red Cross, Emergency System for Advance Registration of Volunteer Health Professionals, Medical Reserve Corps, etc.), and other potential users of volunteers (e.g., hospitals, fire and police departments, etc.)—must develop protocols governing the activation and use of volunteers. Careful coordination is required to ensure the provision of services is not hindered by unaddressed safety and security considerations or legal or regulatory issues. For personnel to be credentialed so they can serve in NIMS-defined positions on a complex multi-jurisdictional incident (incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Emergency Responder Credentialing System), a stakeholder’s credentialing system must meet the minimum personnel-qualification guidelines specified by the NIC. A credential issued by a non-federal authority that is designed to be interoperable with the federal PIV credential is known as a PIV-Interoperable (PIV-I) card. Both PIV and PIV-I use the same open technical standard: Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) 201. The difference between PIV and PIV-I is that the PIV includes a type of background check that is unique to federal employees and contractors. State, local, and tribal jurisdictions are encouraged to use the federal CIO’s PIV-I guidance to develop credentials similar to the Federal Government’s PIV cards to promote consistency. If using a similar format, non-federal issuers are encouraged to fill Zone 9-Header with the state, local, tribal government, private sector, or volunteer or not-for-profit organization as appropriate. Additionally, the image underlying Zones 8, 10, and 14 would be the emblem for their organization. Additional optional placements of data are contained in FIPS 201 itself which can be obtained from National Institute of Standards and Technology.

    1 year ago
  8. The issue of credentials for physicians and RNs is a thorny one. Many physicians are unhappy with the "top secret clearance" type of background forms required to be certified in any national physician credential system. Also, physicians feel that outside jurisdiction medical support would not be needed or expected to arrive until after 72 hours of the incident. Restated: no outside jurisdiction physicians will be arriving into the area of the incident until such medical support is requested by an incident commander. Then, local protocols may allow for the mere use of a hospital ID card from a issuing hospital, and not necessarily a "physicians ID card". Hospitals are more concerned with the idea that the MD has current privileges at a hospital, not an MD who maybe has lost his privileges and is not practicing in a peer related facility. I collected this information during an informal poll of a trauma physician newsgroup and received responses from about a dozen MDs. In fact, one MD said there needs to be evidence-based medicine studies that mutual aid physicians (in the form of DMAT, MRC, NDMS, etc.) are an actual benefit to the incident. So, the de facto ID for a visiting physician is a hospital ID card with the word physician printed on it.

    1 year ago
  9. Additional information on incident issues (RE: Boston). I would suggest anyone with a deep interest in the subject of Boston check out the Boston EMS MCI protocol ( http://www.integratedtrainingsummit.org/presentations/2008/main_training_summit/course_18_-_tale_of_two_cities_and_the_running_of_a_planned_mass_casualty_event_-_serino_richard.pdf ).

    1 year ago

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