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Is "who" missing in target capabilities guideline?

The target capabilities guideline clearly defines the performance measures and metrics. Would it help if it included recommendations on who is responsible for each measure at the implementation level ? Something along the lines of "owner" for each measure and metric.

Submitted by 2 years ago

Comments (4)

  1. Well said AJ!

    you can have all the good looking charts and spreadsheets in the world, but if you do not have the warm bodies with the proper certifications and levels of training to fill them, they will not impress people at a very ugly AAR.

    2 years ago
  2. AJ has it right. I would comment to creativeogre that I am much less worried about an ugly AAR than an actual event.....

    2 years ago
  3. NIMS defines the preparedness cycle as “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” Exercises play an important role in this broad preparedness cycle. The Target Capabilities List describes the capabilities related to the four homeland security mission areas: Prevent, Protect, Respond, and Recover. It defines and provides the basis for assessing preparedness. It also establishes national guidance for preparing the Nation for major all-hazards events, such as those defined by the National Planning Scenarios. The current version of the TCL contains 37 core capabilities. The Target Capabilities List provides a guide to addressing the priorities and achieving the National Preparedness Guidelines. Capabilities provide the means to accomplish a mission and achieve desired outcomes by performing critical tasks, under specified conditions, to target levels of performance. The TCL provides a guide for development of a national network of capabilities that will be available when and where they are needed to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from major events. These capabilities define all-hazards preparedness and provide the basis for assessing preparedness and improving decisions related to preparedness investments and strategies. Personnel qualification relies on a combination of training, operational experience (during exercises or incidents), job shadowing, and administrative requirements. The NIMS TRAINING PROGRAM considers qualified personnel to be more than simply the sum of their training, and developing minimum expectations for functional qualification of personnel is an important part of the National Training Program for NIMS. Incident experience must supplement training for a candidate to meet minimum expectations to qualify for service in an all-hazards NIMS position during a complex multi-jurisdictional incident nationwide (incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Emergency Responder Credentialing System). Personnel qualification is closely related to credentialing, which is inherently a stakeholder responsibility. For personnel to be credentialed so they can serve in NIMS-defined positions on a complex multi-jurisdictional incident (incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Emergency Responder Credentialing System), a stakeholder’s credentialing system must meet the minimum personnel-qualification guidelines specified by the NIC. Personnel qualification guidance will list the performance requirements, through position task books or tasks, for specific positions in a format that allows a trainee to be evaluated against written guidelines. These tasks, based on core competencies and associated behaviors, are the measurable activities that demonstrate proficiency associated with the competencies and behaviors. Successful performance of all tasks during exercises, job shadowing, and/or operations for a relevant position, as observed and recorded by an evaluator, results in a recommendation to the certifying agency that the trainee be qualified in that position. Training and experience for personnel qualification are acquired through course-based knowledge development; risk-free practical application, such as tabletop exercises and planned exercises; and on the job training, such as job shadowing, planned events, and IC experience during small incidents. Once trained, personnel will test and practice their skills during specific exercises and demonstrate their skills by effective management of and response to actual incidents. This goal is met by building and maintaining capabilities to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from major incidents, both natural and man-made. The ability of the homeland security community to achieve and sustain these capabilities requires engaging in capabilities-based planning by orienting the aforementioned preparedness cycle activities (planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and improvement planning) to achieve target levels of capability. Exercise and mission/incident after-action reports should include an evaluation of the effectiveness and performance of incident-management personnel. Recommendations for improvements should be incorporated throughout the national coordination process for NIMS training to tailor stakeholder training plans as well as training and qualification of specific personnel, provide feedback to the national curriculum for NIMS and training courses, and perhaps suggest modifications of the NIMS, National Response Framework, and stakeholder plans.

    1 year ago
  4. POSTED: The target capabilities guideline clearly defines the performance measures and metrics. Would it help if it included recommendations on who is responsible for each measure at the implementation level ? Something along the lines of "owner" for each measure and metric.

    COMMENT: Competency, Capability, Task,and as shocking as this may seep we are evaluating whether the matric items got performed ,and to what extent, on the exercise itself.

    The posting is questining the inclusion of the individual.

    Now that matter gets addressed before the individuals leave the incident or exercise site on the ICS-225 and TASK-BOOKs.

    1 year ago

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