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Idea#128

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Mobile Apps For FEMA Employees And The Public Utilizing GPS

An app that utilizes GPS coordinates to aid in disaster response, send relevant emergency alerts to the user, and ability to locate loved ones by last known location.

For better description -

http://goo.gl/Ujaz7 (FEMA - Challenge.gov)

http://goo.gl/mod/4Gud (GSA - Making Mobile Dialogue - 3rd place)

Submitted by Coulter Johnson 2 years ago

Comments (15)

  1. jc

    You should look into the free "f-Ready" IPhone app. It uses the "Disaster ID" signaling method along with notifying 3 Facebook friends of your GPS location when you initially set the alert prior to a disaster (hurricane, tornado, tsunami, etc..)arriving. Once the disaster passes the user switches the disaster ID to survivor mode and the screen starts to flash in the appropriate color to indicate they survived and if towers are still working then it transmits the fact you survived along with the new GPS location to your 3 Facebook friends. Your 3 friends can communicate your last GPS location to authorities and the phone user uses his screen to signal SAR teams looking for them. The f-Ready app is part of the ASPR Lifeline Facebook Application Challenge and is all about preparedness. Keep in mind if towers are not working your 3 friends know your last known location and the user can still signal using the cellular phone screen.

    2 years ago
  2. The issue really isn't in creationg the app it is in using the information sent in via the app. This morning at the Emergency Preparedness Conference in Vancouver, BC there was a presentation on this same idea. An open source program that they suggested to us is Ushahidi (http://ushahidi.com) which takes the information sent in via an app, Twitter, Facebook, etc. and links it to a GIS map system ... I haven't relly looked into the details, however, but on the face of it it does appear that this is the something that many agencies could use to gain situational awareness in a disaster ... provided cell service is available.

    2 years ago
  3. See the topic regarding the U.S. National Grid:

    http://fema.ideascale.com/a/dtd/U.S.-National-Grid-as-the-Response-Language-of-Location/320144-14692

    Any use / training on GPS should incorporate the U.S. National Grid (MGRS).

    2 years ago
  4. Regarding several of the comments above, and the idea in general, easy to support if we implement a standards-based (USNG) enterprise where "having GPS coordinates" or "your 3 friends can communicate your last GPS location to authorities and the phone user uses his screen to signal SAR teams looking for them" means using a common ops grid (NOT any of the versions of LAT/LONG for several important reasons, including that our USAR teams and military support like the National Guard use USNG...).

    2 years ago
    1. jc

      Great input.

      2 years ago
  5. Some of the alerting capabilities are already in use in larger cities (ie: NY-Alert - http://www.nyalert.gov) but others cannot use such systems due to pricing restraints. Once more areas "jump on the bandwagon" this may be the future of emergency management even though these tools were needed yesterday..

    2 years ago
  6. There are a bunch of Android phone apps for this. And the issue is intelligently selecting the notifications to be displayed on your map. And filtering out non emergencies, or time frames, or replay them in time sequence to see the pattern move.

    2 years ago
  7. Ham radio has had the APRS system for GPS and messages for over 10 years, and it could be a model for other inputs and mapping events, not just stations. The system is alreaady generalized for various networks to report to the mapping serviers. Look at http://APRS.FI to see a map with fixed and mobile stations, including vehicles and weather to see a live sample.

    2 years ago
  8. Could someone please name some of the Android apps that serve this function?

    2 years ago
    1. jc

      Go to www.triagelights.com and you will see the link to the free "f-Ready" app.

      2 years ago
    2. Search the app store on-line or on your phone for: "MGRS"

      2 years ago
  9. Government employees don't need an emergency mobile application, the people who are truly affected by natural or man made disasters need the use of mobile application technology. That is why our idea (MEC) is for the people not the government.

    2 years ago
  10. In the Pacific Northwest we really need mobile apps that are connected to a Japan-like seismic early warning system. The 40-60 seconds of advance warning this type of system offers (literally outrunning the main energy waves) could save many lives given the inventory of seismically unsound (see also brick) structures in our larger communities.

    2 years ago
  11. This functionality is precisely what is built into the Ayoudo App. If you're using your phone it determines where you are via GPS and on the web it is able to approximate using IP numbers. Based on this data, the app can connect you to people and resources close by. The primary function of the app s to ask for help (i.e. I need someone to help sandbag my property) but all the help requests are geolocated and sorted by distance.

    2 years ago
  12. For preliminary damage assessments Would be nice to have the U.S. National Grid (MGRS) with GPS like MS streets and trips mapping program or similar, with a feature to send saved location and type of damage coordinates automatically by cell phone or when any internet connection is found with notice to sender info sent, other wise upon returning to EOC the damage info could down load through blue tooth to the operations center printers and or PC of their choice.

    2 years ago

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