I agree to Idea Providing Equal Access to Emergency and Disaster Information
Voting Disabled
I disagree to Idea Providing Equal Access to Emergency and Disaster Information

Rank1231

Idea#1689

This idea is active.
FEMA Think Tank »

Providing Equal Access to Emergency and Disaster Information

Local communities and individual residents in general lack the skills, education and know-how to properly prepare themselves for emergencies and disasters. This can be attributed to many factors but the following three major factors will be discussed here. First, people in general have failed to be prepared for emergencies and disasters because they have not been made aware of the dangers and hazards that may affect their local communities. Second, readiness campaigns in the past have only offered limited access to generalized information that is not geographically specific to the types of threats each community might face. Third, people without internet access have been left without any easily accessible way to get information on how to prepare for emergencies and disasters. A solid and cost effective solution that would reach a diverse audience and be able to provide geographically specific and expert organized information about local hazards and how to prepare accordingly is needed. The solution proposed here is simple, cheap and easy to maintain. Placing bulletin board type structures in all the city, county and state parks that would feature disaster information and local hazard information is a good way to involve residents in being proactive about disaster preparedness. Unlike other methods used to prompt residents in the past to become disaster ready, this program would actually provide an abundant amount of information that would be location specific, all in one place, reliable, easily accessible, in multiple languages and free.

Submitted by 7 months ago

Comments (8)

  1. Poster starts with three assumptions about why preparedness efforts fail -- in my experience all three of those assumptions are false. Her second assumption demonstrates that the first and third assumptions are false.

    I really am glad to see a bright young lady taking an interest in disaster preparedness, but before solving the world's problems she needs to research the real world. Preparedness campaigns have been on-going long before internet access was even heard of outside academia. Most preparedness campaigns are carried out on a local basis and ARE focused on specific local hazards. And most preparedness campaigns consist largely of the distribution of written materials which certainly do not require either internet access or computer skills.

    7 months ago
  2. We cannot do it alone task of multi-agency support outdoor response operation COP

    Training ia everyday activities depends on the event update. No one lack of understanding that is wrong ideal collective info and re-change education is about learning all is future.

    7 months ago
  3. Libraries would be a good place to put information...

    6 months ago
  4. While most of the content found in HSEEP is not sensitive or classified, some HSEEP materials (e.g., scenario examples), particularly those in Volume IV, may necessitate restrictions on distribution. Exercise materials that are produced in accordance with HSEEP guidance and are deemed sensitive should be designated as For Official Use Only (FOUO). FOUO identifies unclassified information of a sensitive nature, not otherwise categorized by statute or regulations, of which the unauthorized disclosure could adversely impact a person’s privacy or welfare, the conduct of Federal programs, or programs or operations essential to national interest. Examples of materials that may require FOUO designation include scenario information, the Master Scenario Events List (MSEL), and the After Action Report / Improvement Plan (AAR/IP). Access to FOUO information is on a need-to-know basis. FOUO information may be shared with other agencies; Federal, State, local, or tribal government; appropriate private sector representatives; and law enforcement officials, provided a specific need-to-know has been established and the information is shared in furtherance of a coordinated and official governmental activity.

    Certain exercise-related information from private sector partners may require or be eligible for additional protections under the Protective Critical Infrastructure Information (PCII) Program. Established pursuant to the Critical Infrastructure Information (CII) Act of 2002, the PCII Program is an information-protection tool that enables members of the private sector to submit proprietary, confidential, or sensitive infrastructure information to DHS with the assurance that the information will be protected from public disclosure. Under the PCII Program, information that satisfies the requirements of the CII Act of 2002 is protected from public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), State and local disclosure laws, and use in civil litigation. DHS and other Federal, State, and local analysts use PCII in pursuit of a more secure homeland, focusing primarily on analyzing and securing critical infrastructure and protected systems, identifying vulnerabilities and developing risk assessments, and enhancing recovery preparedness measures.

    6 months ago
  5. AGREEMENT: N4AOF position is validated.

    Under the PCII Program, information that satisfies the requirements of the CII Act of 2002 is protected from public disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). This portion can be agreed to. However, melissa.reed fails to indicate that the vast majority of the CIKR-related assets, systems, and networks are owned and operated by the private sector.These operators and their employees are from the communities in which they serve and are not ignorant of their duties and responsibilities under NRF/NIMS/NIPP.

    DISAGREEMENT:"Readiness campaigns in the past have only offered limited access to generalized information that is not geographically specific to the types of threats each community might face." The failure of one community is not the failure of another. On the other hand, the perception may distort the reality if documentation cannot be produced to validate the assertion.

    One shoe does not fit all. Here it will be suggested that a THIRA is not the same for every geographic area and accordingly training, equipping, exercise, evaluation, qualification, and credentialing to personnel resource inventory for compensated and volunteer may very. The posted solution is a personnel responsibility and certainly there has been no public inspection of each household within the jurisdiction nor accurate record to indicate validation of the assertion posted.Just as an alternate suggestion,Governments at all levels should work with the private sector to establish a common set of expectations consistent with Federal, State, tribal, and local roles, responsibilities, and methods of operations. These expectations should be widely disseminated and the necessary training and practical exercises conducted so that they are thoroughly understood in advance of an actual incident. These expectations are particularly important with respect to private-sector organizations involved in CIKR areas. In addition, private-sector organizations may wish to consider entering into assistance agreements with governments or other private-sector organizations to clarify the respective capabilities, roles, and expectations of the parties involved in preparing for and responding to an incident. Finally, the private sector may be a source for best practices in emergency management and incident response. To this extent a Training & Exercise planning workshop might be conducted to produce a TEP inclusive of the 'WHOLE COMMUNITY' rather than dwelling on postings in parks that only pertain to household emergency plans. Personnel with roles in emergency management and incident response at all levels of government—including persons with leadership positions, such as elected and appointed officials—should be appropriately trained to improve all-hazards capabilities nationwide. Those who lead emergency response efforts must communicate and support engagement with the whole community by developing shared goals and aligning capabilities to reduce the risk of any jurisdiction being overwhelmed in times of crisis. Individuals can also contribute to the preparedness and resilience of their households and communities by volunteering with emergency organizations (e.g., the local chapter of the American Red Cross, Medical Reserve Corps, or Community Emergency Response Teams [CERTs]) and completing emergency response training courses.National preparedness is the shared responsibility of our whole community. Every member contributes, including individuals, communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and Federal, State, and local governments.

    NIMS defines the preparedness cycle as “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” Exercises play an important role in this broad preparedness cycle.

    Recognition that government at all levels cannot manage disasters alone means that communities need the opportunity to draw on their full potential to operate effectively. Empowering local action requires allowing members of the communities to lead—not follow—in identifying priorities, organizing support, implementing programs, and evaluating outcomes. The emergency manager promotes and coordinates, but does not direct, these conversations and efforts. Lasting impacts of long-term capacity building can be evident in an evolving set of civic practices and habits among leaders and the public that become embedded in the life of the community.

    Leveraging and strengthening existing social infrastructure, networks, and assets means investing in the social, economic, and political structures that make up daily life and connecting them to emergency management programs. A community in general consists of an array of groups, institutions, associations, and networks that organize and control a wide variety of assets and structure social behaviors. Local communities have their own ways of organizing and managing this social infrastructure. Understanding how communities operate under normal conditions (i.e., before a disaster) is critical to both immediate response and long-term recovery after a disaster.

    6 months ago
  6. When I read this idea, I immediately go to how the community can be better informed about disasters in general, prepared for disasters, and know where to find resources that relate to them.

    How can an individual and a community deliberately set out to become resident becomes the question. One of the most successful efforts has been to hold community discussions about common disasters in their area and how it will affect them. The community can benefit from knowing what role local services are responsible for. The roles and community expectations of firefighters and police will not be the ones that they are familiar with. Many people who rely on police and ambulance services to "rescue" them will not receive that service during a disaster. One of the biggest benefits of community discussions comes with sharing the fear that disaster brings. When those fears are found to be in common, networks begin to form among neighbors to provide assistance to each other. New ideas about how to "weather" a disaster are formulated. The community to be educated is not only local residents, but police, firefighters, hospitals, and social services educated about individuals who may need extra support. During a disaster, things are not the same as usual, nor are they the same afterwards.

    6 months ago
  7. Most people don't get the message because they ignore the sound. I recently moved from Arkansas To Florida (Tornado Country to Hurricane Country) and disaster wise I know more about the area in six months as to what to expect and what to do in case of... than my father-in-law who has lived here 35 years. I took the time to find out.

    6 months ago
  8. Pure Discussions? Very Doubtful-? Providing Equal Access to Emergency and Disaster Information.The preparedness cycle is “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” Individuals can also contribute to the preparedness and resilience of their households and communities by volunteering with emergency organizations (e.g., the local chapter of the American Red Cross, Medical Reserve Corps, or Community Emergency Response Teams [CERTs]) and completing emergency response training courses. Individuals, families, and households should make preparations with family members who have access and functional needs or medical needs.

    Whole Community is a means by which residents, emergency management practitioners, organizational and community leaders, and government officials can collectively understand and assess the needs of their respective communities and determine the best ways to organize and strengthen their assets, capacities, and interests. National preparedness is the shared responsibility of our whole community. Every member contributes, including individuals, communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and Federal, State, and local governments. We describe our security and resilience posture through the core capabilities that are necessary to address risks, and we will use an integrated, layered, and all-of-Nation approach as our foundation.Discussions and eduction about not what is going to happen is not the solution of what shall happen when planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate is applied to the 'WHOLE COMMUNITY' and everyone accepts and performs to their responsibility.

    6 months ago

Vote Activity Show