I agree to Idea School Shootings
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School Shootings

Let every class room in the USA adopt a dog for each class room.These dogs could be let loose at any non authorized intruder who would be at that point occupied by barking dogs and not targeting not people. The kids would learn how to care for their class pet and the class pet would help protect the class. If all dogs are let loose at the same time on the intruder the intruder will have no time to attack the kids or anyone else.

Submitted by 1 year ago

Comments (32)

  1. The idea sounds great. However, well intentioned does not afford absolute child and authorized personnel safety from an attach from a dog/s. Compounding this is there seems to be no collaboration or agreement among the animal rights community. Would it even be possible for 'Public Schools' to use solid entrance doors with card keys to only allow entrance to students and authorized employees? Would it be possible also that all inside doors would be of solid manufactor and could be opened from the outside with only a card key and could only be opened from the inside without a card-key to prevent any unauthorized entrance into a classroom ? Would it even be possible to prohibit the bringing of back-packs onto a school property? Would it even be beneficial to install inside the building an observation point with video surveillance to the from outside entrances to disable key-card entrance if a threat is observed? The issue is always unauthorized entry and presence not the firearm. Any perpetrator can select a different device and method to extract the same or greater result. Accordingly, prohibiting unauthored entry is the core resolution and open exposure of items of possession negates or minimizes cancelled weapons. Solid doors requiring card-keys avoids an unauthorized individual breaking a glass window on a door to gain entrance. It is suggested that FEMA courses IS-106,IS-906, and IS-907 be reviewed and these methods, procedures, and policies should be adapted to physical school security, safety, and prevention.

    1 year ago
  2. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    I did't say attack dogs and animal rights would love the idea. So would the kids and most parents. There are not absolute security systems that would work unless you put a cop in each class room and we do not need that. A barking dog does not mean they are an attack dog but the shooter would not know which ones bite and which ones will not. you would know where the shooter or shooters are located within the school. It would be the fastest and easiest solution to implement. Do it for a year or two and if it does not work drop it and make our schools prison camps that will make kids think twice about revenge wouldn't it.

    1 year ago
    1. I like the idea of guard dogs on a school campus. Perhaps not in every class room, but available in each school to sniff out drugs, The trainer patrolling the school. Perhaps going to random schools on "rounds" students/faculty not knowing where, or when the dog/trainer is there. and anything else that might be teachable that the dog could recognize and alert the trainer. I think keeping the doors to schools locked is a good idea. Money for this plan will be the out cry from people. Especially in tight economic times. The real cost is human lives. Once the parents realize their children will be safe, perhaps the money issue will fade. What is their childs life worth? It's a sad state of affairs that we have to worry about children/teachers being shot in school. The deeper issue is why there is so much mental illness today? And, why shooting children? Is anyone studying that? Prevention should start with the child in the early grades. Behavior might indicate future violence. But then, how do you "watch" this potential child perpetrator all through life? Branding a troubled person for life could jepardize his/her future job prospects. freedom will be less and less, and we will hear a out cry on freedom issues. All valid points. Lots of thinking needed. So, lets discuss. Should we just stick our heads in the sand and continue on the path we are on? What is thought about the security pass through used in air ports, court houses, to alert a gun is on a person? I am against body searches. I think access to the purchase of guns is too easy. A point to consider perhaps? Turn on the television and many programs are about muder cases. Night after night. A steady diet of it. We are "entertained" by death and suffering. Young people and mentally challenged may wnt to be the lead character in their own "show" something to consider program executives! Who will read my small cry to stop this kind of thing? The "games" of shooting. We are drenched in death, and children are beoming desensitized to death. War, games, television, real life. Awful!

      1 year ago
  3. The issue is always unauthorized entry and presence not the firearm. Any perpetrator can select a different device and method to extract the same or greater result. Accordingly, prohibiting unauthored entry is the core resolution. Solid doors requiring card-keys avoids an unauthorized individual breaking a glass window on a door to gain entrance.

    1 year ago
    1. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

      You can do that with a camera and a buzzer.

      1 year ago
  4. All complements are appreciated...That kind of thing !

    Some simple suggestions: Develop a 'Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment', Develop an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP), Develop and conduct a Training and Exercise Plan Workshop (T&EPW), develop a Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan, implement building security to federal building security guidelines, develop a Exercise Plan (Ex-PLN), conduct a progression of exercises to validate training, equipment,methods and procedures (HSEEP).

    http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/emischool/

    National Incident Management System Courses, The U.S. Departments of Homeland Security and Education recommend all key personnel involved in school emergency management and incident response take the NIMS, ICS, and NRF training courses and support the implementation of NIMS. Currently, key personnel are required to complete four courses in order for an individual or organization to be considered NIMS compliant through FY 2007.To date, the following courses are required:IS-100.SC/IS-100.SCa: Introduction to the Incident Command System, I-100 for Schools,IS-200: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents, IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction,IS-800.B: National Response Framework, An Introduction,The following additional courses are recommended for leadership personnel:ICS 300 Intermediate Incident Command System,ICS 400 Advanced Incident Command System

    For further information on NIMS implementation activities for K-12 Schools and higher education institutions, click here.All-Hazard Courses:E361 Multihazard Emergency Planning for Schools IS-362.a Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools (on-line Independent Study Course)

    Personnel qualification relies on a combination of training, operational experience (during exercises or incidents), job shadowing, and administrative requirements (such as agency association and criminal background checks). The Plan considers qualified personnel to be more than simply the sum of their training, and developing minimum expectations for functional qualification of personnel is an important part of the National Training Program for NIMS. To ensure that stakeholders implement NIMS, the NIC evaluates implementation using NIMS Compliance Objectives (requirements). These compliance objectives are regulated at the organizational or jurisdictional level, and Federal policy requires jurisdictions and organizations to meet NIMS compliance requirements as a condition for receiving Federal preparedness assistance (through grants, contracts, and other activities). The NIMS compliance objectives for training typically require that stakeholders are providing their personnel with appropriate NIMS training.

    1 year ago
  5. While is seems to be a solution in your mind.... the general fact remains. the human element in the matter is the the most unpredictable element..... Had there been trained dogs in the classrooms, would not this young man who attended the school have befriended or even taken care of the animal while he attended class there? I agree with mjcyranwd6alm the human element is where the problem lies. Until we hols each other responsible for our actions and not slap the hand or talk about a serious inftraction, these type of events are going to happen. These events are domestic terrorism by definition. What is causing these seemingly acceptable people in society to "snap"? Is there something transmitted by terrorists in video games? Is it over cell networks? Are we too connected? Is it because we can't punish our kids the old fashioned way? Is it because we allow the lazy people in scociety to dictate the rules and laws because they "deserve better" instead of pulling their boot straps up and making a better life for themselves and their family? It all ties back to the human element. This country has become lazy. We are in a gian toilet bowl swirling the hole and nobody can seem to reach the handle to jiggle it.

    1 year ago
  6. Before animals are considered try application of FEMA publications; 428,426, and 452.

    1 year ago
  7. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    FEMA 428,426, and 452 cost money animals help us them and the kids the programs you sight do not.

    1 year ago
  8. Sorry about that, but there is the appearance that the animal rights groups, public attorneys, and health officials are not going to 'BUY-IN' to other than 'Service Dogs' (seeing eye dogs) being quartered on school property.

    Parents may also raise liability issues if their child gets bitten.

    1 year ago
    1. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

      Sure your right. Armed guards on school property is better than trained dogs.

      How does the liability issue compare with their child getting shot?

      1 year ago
    2. The security dogs do not have to be present in the class room. In fact, it could be a distraction to the students. Dogs on the premises, say the principals office, or basement, where there are basements, or dogs patrolling the halls when students are in class might work. Dogs can be trained not bite people I think. Unless commnded to do so. I still like the idea of passing through a metal detector first. Then have the dogs for security on other issues until other measures can be implimented. Such as key cards, fences, and any other security measures deemed acceptable. Surely a situation worthy of discussion and action as soon as possible. Nothing is infalable. But we should try now for a solution.

      1 year ago
  9. @ vanmikehill - How many teachers from different school districts have you polled about "dogs in the classroom."

    Whose budget is going to train each dog & handler, purchase the dog food, leashes, collars, muzzles, and veterinary care? Where are these dogs staying each night and on weekends/holidays?

    Animal welfare groups & health departments would never let “a dog in each classroom” move beyond "idea phase."

    Please poll parents if they have read (or have) a copy of their child's district safety plan (this is where minds start thinking and people start talking about “when this happens, we do/don’t do […]” Or we should change this because […]” (whole community)

    Metal detectors, wands, and dogs do not play a role in "preventing" active shootings; but rather lend a false sense of security.

    Threat assessment, *cameras, solid wood/steel doors, *key-card access, ongoing training for all staff, with each school putting their safety plan to the test with the county EMA prevent and/or significantly slow an active shooter down to the point they may "give up" or the police would have already arrived. *Backup for the above goes without saying & is found on secure/restricted forums.

    Please take the FEMA courses that mjcyranwd6alm has posted, and take a look at the EMI School Program (page) http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/emischool/

    1 year ago
    1. @vanmikehill, I don't see "armed guards" mentioned as prevention, but rather ways to stop (prevent) an active shooter (or other threat) from entering the building with solid wood doors (the prisons I have worked all had solid wood/steel filled doors to *prevent& unauthorized access), key cards (cards can be deactivated daily; i.e., a teacher calls for a substitute; that teachers card will be deactivated (for the day) so it cannot be used by anyone else)... do same for absent students, and lost cards. Instead of dogs, mitigate, training, testing the plan, involve the parents & community in formulating plans, revisit the plans often and as needed to make changes.

      1 year ago
  10. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    One more thing a dog can dress up like security guard and get through the door

    1 year ago
  11. Protection trained dogs don't make good classroom pets. If the dog is docile enough to tolerate a room full of children, it's unlikely the dog would be effective as a protection dog. They require a handler. They can not simply be allowed to work independently in a school environment unsupervised. A bulling incident would result in a badly injured student. Having several high drive dogs unsupervised will lead to dogfights and injured dogs. They are expensive; $5,000-&10,000. These are starting prices for patrol dogs, not dual-purpose patrol and drug or explosives detection, nor dogs with the specialized training what you suggest would require. Keep in mind, these dogs must be trained to do their job with the sound of intense gunfire and people screaming and running distracting them. Most dogs not specifically bred for protection will not have the right drives, nerves or trainability to perform the task you describe.

    1 year ago
    1. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

      How can you passably know what you are saying about how the dogs will act is true? When it has never been tried? And besides as far a a early warning system and or a perp locator they would be unmatched. And I am sure there are breads that with not back away from a stranger with a weapon in the room or on school grounds.

      1 year ago
  12. Here is what has been suggested; 1)'Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment'2)Develop an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP),3)Training and Exercise Plan Workshop (T&EPW), 4)develop a Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan, 5)implement building security to federal building security guidelines,6)develop a Exercise Plan (Ex-PLN), 7) Conduct a progression of exercises to validate training, equipment, methods and procedures (HSEEP).8)National Incident Management System Courses (IS-100.SC/IS-100.SCa: Introduction to the Incident Command System, I-100 for Schools,IS-200: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents, IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction,IS-800.B: National Response Framework, An Introduction, The following additional courses are recommended for leadership personnel:ICS 300 Intermediate Incident Command System,ICS 400 Advanced Incident Command System, All-Hazard Courses:E361 Multihazard Emergency Planning for Schools IS-362.a Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools),9) Personnel qualification relies on a combination of training, operational experience (during exercises or incidents), job shadowing, and administrative requirements (such as agency association and criminal background checks). The Plan considers qualified personnel to be more than simply the sum of their training, and developing minimum expectations for functional qualification of personnel is an important part of the National Training Program for NIMS. 10) Application of design and methods within FEMA publications; 428,426, and 452.What is being addressed is a very serious subject. ‘Exercising prudent actions to avoid placing or endangering the life and safety of minor children within public school prosperities'. Additional firearms laws, pets or attach dogs, and armed guards/police on campus does not assure a resolution to the core problem of entrance and unauthorized presence in, on, around, or about public school properties. Solid doors with card-key locks is only a beginning. While politicians focus on firearms, emergency managers understand that any public property is subject to CBRNE/WMD not just active-shooters.1) Access security should be equal to/ or be better than the access to the jurisdictions Emergency Operations Center (EOC), 2) Training is instruction in core competencies and skills. It is the principal means by which individuals achieve a level of proficiency. Typically, a significant part of the TT&E program will involve training.3) Exercises are events that allow participants to apply their skills and knowledge to improve operational readiness. These situations ultimately resulted from lack of attention and application of mitigation and security procedures. These situations ultimately resulted from lack of application and establishment of perimeter control within a quarter mile radius around the school property. These situations ultimately resulted from lack of school personnel to plan, equip, train, and exercise to national NIMS/HSEEP standards and procedures as related to schools. Bluntly, this individual rejects the notion of the 'Cost-Excuse' as applied to any 'PREVENTION' or 'MITIGATION' items since a public entity can get the necessary funding from either FEMA grants or public bonding. Speculation would hold that if the public and parents are concerned for their children’s safety, that they would have no problem voting in a bond issue. Public school buildings and properties are public properties and subject to the same security controls as any other public properties. This includes searches of all bags, brief-cases, back-packs and containers introduced on public properties. This includes exclusion of all persons from a classroom for which they have not been assigned. This also includes physical inability to enter any school building or property without prior written authorization. There are only leaders that do not need to be told what is necessary to be done. Then there are the followers who always must be told what needs to be done and what they must do.

    1 year ago
  13. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    Sorry you all can not see the forest through because of the trees. You say Animal welfare groups & health departments would never let “a dog in each classroom” move beyond "idea phase." Because the "LIFER" attitudes like on here. You miss the point my friend. Having dogs that are not "attack" dogs that the kids are involved with as part of their training along with reading, writing, mathematics and disaster management is the only early warning system that would work. Dogs bark when a stranger is near. They alert other dogs in the school and when they are all let loose they prevent intruders from advancing as fast as they would otherwise. It would be nice if some ideas on here were discussed instead of aborted at birth.

    1 year ago
    1. Sorry, that was supposed to be a "disagree" vote, vanmikehill.

      On the National Preparedness Listserve, there is an ongoing discussion on school safety:

      http://community.fema.gov/connect.ti/readynpm/view?objectId=62827

      All school safety discussions:

      http://community.fema.gov/connect.ti/readynpm/searchGroup?spiderFormState=S&objectType=-&searchtermAND=School+safety&fname=&pageaction=F&byuid=&findbutton=Search&searchtermOR=&searchtermNOT=&numDays=-

      1 year ago
  14. Dog/s bark offender runs away ? Very doubtful. The issue is always unauthorized entry and presence not the firearm. Any perpetrator can select a different device and method to extract the same or greater result. Accordingly, prohibiting unauthored entry is the core resolution. Solid doors requiring card-keys avoids an unauthorized individual breaking a glass window on a door to gain entrance.

    1 year ago
  15. Active shooters in schools: The enemy is denial

    http://www.policeone.com/active-shooter/articles/2058168-Active-shooters-in-schools-The-enemy-is-denial/

    ...active shooter prevention, mitigation... same as we did for fire. Good read.

    School Safety from Lt. Col. Dave Grossman:

    http://www.killology.com/school_safety_notes.htm

    Lt. Col. Dave Grossman's Curriculum Vitae:

    http://www.killology.com/vitae.htm#personal

    1 year ago
  16. vanmikehill previously comments that,"FEMA 428,426, and 452 cost money animals help us them and the kids the programs you sight do not".FEMA publications 428,426, and 452 address 'Buildings and Infrastructure Protection'. The looming question is: If dog,care,maintance, and liabilities associated with animal ownership cost money, then what is the problem with implementation of 'Best Practices' to 1)Save lives,2)Stabilize a potential incident,3)Protect property? Can we afford to ignore the implementation of federal building standards to safeguard the life and safety of school administrators, employees and students? How can it ever be allowed that a public school property is less secure than a local police station? Doesn’t the local public school attendance officer deserve the same level of security as the Social Security clerk at a federal office building during rendition of duties during employment? NIMS defines the preparedness cycle as “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” This is a progressive on-going cycle. Total property ‘MITIGATION’ will not happen overnight but is required to be pursued on a progressive and on-going bases. FEMA publications 428,426 and 452 are suggestive of this aspect. However, the posting is suggestive of just placing dogs in the school house and termination of further activities. In the alternate, it is suggested that public schools do receive federal funding either indirectly or directly and/or both and should acknowledge a responsibility toward NIMS compliance as it relates to HSPD-5, HSPD-8/PPD-8, (National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD)-51/Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-20, National Continuity Policy) . Risk management is the process to identify, control, and minimize the impact of uncertain events. Security is a key element to any continuity program to protect plans, personnel, facilities, and capabilities to prevent adversaries from interfering with continuity plans and operations. In order to ensure the safety and success of continuity operations, an effective security strategy should address personnel, physical, and information security. Building owners and managers must be the ones to determine their level of risk to each threat and decide from which threats to seek protection. Decision makers who consider their buildings to be at elevated risk may be able to use this guidance to mitigate the potential risks from hazards or terrorist attacks against their buildings. A serious review of IS-100.SC/IS-100.SCa: Introduction to the Incident Command System, I-100 for Schools,IS-200: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents, IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction,IS-800.B: National Response Framework, An Introduction, The following additional courses are recommended for leadership personnel:ICS 300 Intermediate Incident Command System,ICS 400 Advanced Incident Command System, All-Hazard Courses:E361 Multihazard Emergency Planning for Schools IS-362.a Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools is in order and overdue by many public school officials.

    1 year ago
  17. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    All of that training is great for adults. But it will not teach what the kids need to learn at a young age which is compassion for a helpless living thing that needs care.Most kid can not have pets at at home they never learn to care for a living animal and therefore have no connection to inflicting pain on a living thing and watching it suffer, the result is they grow up with something missing. Compassion for all living things and a work ethic. I am sure parents would either sign a liability waver or send there kids to school that has armed guards and all the Emergency planning the government can pay for.

    1 year ago
  18. @Vanmikehill - Dogs (in the school) are not part of mitigation, preparation, response. I posted some of Lt. Col. Dave Grossman's links three days back (still waiting for moderator to put them through) on this topic.

    1 year ago
  19. Apparently there is a disconnect here insofar as what is expected of adult public school officials,administrators, teachers, and students of any age. Adult or TEEN-CERT is not being addressed here. What is being addressed is building integrity and property security. What is being addressed is the present and future condition of ; Preventing, avoiding, or stopping a threatened or an actual act of terrorism., Protecting our citizens, residents, visitors, and assets against the greatest threats and hazards in a manner that allows our interests, aspirations, and way of life to thrive. , Mitigating the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of future disasters, Responding quickly to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic human needs in the aftermath of a catastrophic incident.. , Recovering through a focus on the timely restoration, strengthening, and revitalization of infrastructure, housing, and a sustainable economy, as well as the health, social, cultural, historic, and environmental fabric of communities affected by a catastrophic incident. The solutions that have been suggested are founded upon ‘LESSONS-LEARNED’, ‘BEST-PRACTICES’, and current federal property standards. ,"FEMA publications 428,426, and 452”, IS-100.SC/IS-100.SCa: Introduction to the Incident Command System, I-100 for Schools,IS-200: ICS for Single Resources and Initial Action Incidents, IS-700: NIMS, An Introduction,IS-800.B: National Response Framework, An Introduction, The following additional courses are recommended for leadership personnel:ICS 300 Intermediate Incident Command System,ICS 400 Advanced Incident Command System, All-Hazard Courses:E361 Multihazard Emergency Planning for Schools IS-362.a Multi-Hazard Emergency Planning for Schools is in order and overdue by many public school officials is only a part of the solution not the whole. The ‘IMAGE’ nor the affective/emotional is not being addressed here. MidnightTrain correctly states,” Metal detectors, wands, and dogs do not play a role in "preventing" active shootings; but rather lend a false sense of security. Threat assessment, *cameras, solid wood/steel doors, *key-card access, ongoing training for all staff, with each school putting their safety plan to the test with the county EMA prevent and/or significantly slow an active shooter down to the point they may "give up" or the police would have already arrived. *Backup for the above goes without saying & is found on secure/restricted forums. Please take the FEMA courses that mjcyranwd6alm has posted, and take a look at the EMI School Program (page) http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/emischool/”. The driver here is a term called ‘STANDARD-OF-CARE’ as that term relates to both state and federal occupational health and safety laws and regulations. Teachers, administrators, and employees, as well as children and parents, never signed-on for death and injury nor has public school districts openly disclosed existent hazards, risks, and vulnerabilities to members of the public, parents, and students. 42czech6 further makes a valid point, “Protection trained dogs don't make good classroom pets. If the dog is docile enough to tolerate a room full of children, its unlikely the dog would be effective as a protection dog. They require a handler. They cannot simply be allowed to work independently in a school environment unsupervised. A bulling incident would result in a badly injured student. Having several high drive dogs unsupervised will lead to dogfights and injured dogs. They are expensive; $5,000-&10,000”. Let there be no error, these “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate” solutions must be implemented by adults. Any shortfalls in funding must be addressed through public bonded debt, shared by the community, or the receipt of grant funds or a combination of both. There can be no substitute to 1)'Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment'2)Develop an Emergency Operations Plan (EOP),3)Training and Exercise Plan Workshop (T&EPW), 4)develop a Multi-Year Training and Exercise Plan, 5)implement building security to federal building security guidelines,6)develop a Exercise Plan (Ex-PLN), and the local public school officials should consult and work with the jurisdiction’s local emergency management agency to identify the shortcomings and close the gaps in building/property security and safety as it relates to life and safety of the legitimate occupants. The first step is to conduct a threat assessment wherein the threat or hazard is identified, defined, and quantified. The next step of the assessment process is to identify the value of a building’s assets that need to be protected. After conducting an asset value assessment, the next step is to conduct a vulnerability assessment. The vulnerability assessment is the bridge in the methodology between threat/hazard, asset value, and the resultant level of risk. The next step of the process is the risk assessment. Thus, a very high likelihood of occurrence with very small consequences may require simple low cost mitigation measures. National preparedness is the shared responsibility of our whole community. Every member contributes, including individuals, communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based organizations, and Federal, State, and local governments. We describe our security and resilience posture through the core capabilities that are necessary to address risks, and we will use an integrated, layered, and all-of-Nation approach as our foundation. We define success as a secure and resilient Nation with the capabilities required across the whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk. National preparedness is the shared responsibility of all levels of government, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens. The objective of PPD-8 is to facilitate an integrated, all-of-Nation, risk informed, capabilities-based approach to preparedness. The suggestion here is that no public entity that accepts federal funds directly or indirectly is exempted by reason of their purported unique identity. As shown, most of the participants, at this point, must agree to disagree just on the subjects of dogs and buzzers but most of all on the issue of long term inaction to application of security, safety, and prevention measures by public school officials. Are your school’s emergency operations plan, policies, and procedures consistent with the ICS principles taught in this course? Do you have the needed communications and other equipment, and vests, badges, and other supplies to implement ICS? Can responders from different agencies (e.g., fire, police, and public works) communicate with school personnel during an emergency? Can responders from different agencies (e.g., fire, agencies (e.g., fire, police, and public works) communicate with school personnel during an emergency? Have you identified qualified personnel to assume ICS Command and General Staff positions? Do you have sufficient backup personnel for all key ICS positions? Have you identified potential locations for ICS facilities (e.g., Incident Command Post, Staging Area, Base, Camp, Heliports, etc.)? Do you practice applying ICS during drills and planned events? Within the past year, have you conducted an exercise for Unified Command with different agencies? Are after-action reviews conducted to identify lessons learned following exercises, drills, planned events, and incidents? Personnel Qualifications is a term used to denote incidents that require responders to hold credentials under the National Credentialing Program. NIMS defines the preparedness cycle as “planning, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking action to correct and mitigate.” Exercises play an important role in this broad preparedness cycle. Terrorism: As defined in the Homeland Security Act of 2002, activity that involves an act that is dangerous to human life or potentially destructive of critical infrastructure or key resources; is a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State or other subdivision of the United States; and appears to be intended to intimidate or coerce a civilian population, to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion, or to affect the conduct of a government by mass destruction, assassination, or kidnapping. Form a Collaborative Planning Team, Understand the Situation, Determine Goals and Objectives, Plan Development, Plan Preparation, Review, Approval, Plan Refinement and Execution.

    1 year ago
  20. I am a former dog owner myself, and understand the emotional commitment that has probably inspired this idea. Sadly, it is highly impractical even on a small scale, and probably would be so in any town or country. Problems relating to violence do not easily go away, and one would have to be a professional in the field to refine any of the ideas behind this suggestion.

    1 year ago
  21. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    You are all missing the point I am talking about high drive dogs or anything even on that level. A mutt will provide an early warming system and are dogs that get along together and with people they will alert and protect, and most of teach. You are right you would have to be a professional lost in the field to misunderstand how simple this is and how easy it could be adopted across the country at no cost to the government or schools.

    1 year ago
  22. High drive dogs, attack dogs, docile dogs etc. do not address the 'CORE-ISSUE' of overall building and property security. This issue is focused upon 'PREVENTION' to access of all individuals who have not receiced prior authorization to be on, around, or about a public school property and is not focused on any response. Unauthorized accress is being addressed along with building integrety. Accordingly, prohibiting unauthored entry is the core resolution. Solid doors requiring card-keys avoids an unauthorized individual breaking a glass window on a door to gain entrance.Further, it is being suggested that by convention that all persons and items entering public buildings are subject to search and that public school properties are not exempted. All laws and procedures followed on other public properties and buildings need to be followed and enforced including prosecution and convictions of offenders.

    1 year ago
  23. vanmikehill Idea Submitter

    Public is not public anymore what you are describing is a police state "Prevention" is not a reality in crazy unless the kids all stay at home. The show me your papers type of security you are imposing would require more funding then we could ever have approved. However a few dogs on the other hand are cheap and can cover the complete school grounds and hallways. It only takes a few to be released to alert the rest of a stranger in a unauthorized area. The only enforcement should be termination.

    1 year ago
  24. In the event of an active shooter situation:

    Evacuate, Attempt to evacuate. Have an escape route and plan Leave your belongings Keep your hands visible, HideFind a place to hide Block entry and lock doors, Remain quiet and silence your cell phone or pager, Take ActionAs a last resort, try to incapacitate the shooter Act with physical aggression, Remember to always: Take note of the two nearest exits in any facility you visit. Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers. CALL 911 WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO!

    1 year ago

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