Support, Coordination, and Command and Management in the NIMS

We welcome your thoughts and ideas on the following topics, which address expanding the discussion on incident support, coordination, and management in the NIMS:

Incident Support Concepts, Coordinating Structures & Multiagency Coordination Systems

The current NIMS provides significant doctrine on the Incident Command System (ICS), which addresses command and management issues, but relatively little on incident support, unified coordinating structures and multi-agency coordination. The inclusion of coordination language would strengthen the scalability and flexibility of the NIMS to address national-level coordination as well as command and management for a large scale, complex, or catastrophic incident. Please share your ideas on how to expand the NIMS to incorporate the coordination and management required for large scale, complex and catastrophic incidents.

Including the Private Sector and other Non-Governmental Stakeholders in Incident Management

The NIMS language on Command Authority, Unified Command, and Area Command is currently geared toward government participants in Unified Command. However, Unified Command is a structure that should use a whole community approach. Please share your thoughts on best practices for non-government participants in the Unified Command.

Including the Private Sector and other Non-Governmental Stakeholders in Incident Support & Coordination

The NIMS language on incident support and coordination is currently geared toward government participants in multiagency coordination systems (MACS) and other multiagency coordination environments such as the Emergency Operation Center (EOC). This discussion should be expanded to include the role of private sector and other non-governmental stakeholders in coordination structures including: the Mitigation Framework Leadership Group (MitFLG); Emergency Support Function Leadership Group (ESFLG); Recovery Support Function Leadership Group (RSFLG); Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources (CIKR) sectors; and Business Emergency Operations Centers (BEOC). Please share your ideas on how best to include private sector and non-governmental stakeholders within NIMS coordination structures.

Public/Private Relationships in Preparing for and Responding to Incidents

The NIMS currently includes language on the importance of pre-disaster and mutual aid agreements to meeting resource requirements and managing incidents. However, indications from the NIC’s initial literature review and research indicate that informal relationships are also important during a disaster. Developing relationships with local non-governmental organizations, private sector representatives, and other groups such as those formed during preparedness activities or through inclusion in coordinating structures like the Mitigation Framework Leadership Group (MitFLG) can be highly valuable. Please share your thoughts on establishing public-private relationships concerning incident management and what guidance would be helpful in achieving these partnerships.

Please feel free to comment on or discuss any or all of these topics. We look forward to hearing from you!

Campaign: Support, Coordination, and Command and Management in the NIMS

NIMS and NRF ESFs (ESF-13)

Although the Emergency Support Functions (ESF) are a National Response Framework (NRF) related response support mechanism, it may be beneficial to consider them during this current NIMS review process. Specifically, ESF-13 Public Safety and Security continues to be identified in lessons learned and preparedness assessment documents as an area lacking maturity or a place for future improvement to support incident management. ...more »

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Defining and scaling Coordination Complexity

The "Core Competency Framework for Multiagency Coordination Systems," Final Report 6 February 2009, by the Homeland Security Institute, introduced the concept of Coordination Complexity. The capability of a MAC (such as an EOC) must be expanded in large, catastrophic disasters in order to meet the requirements of the event. The desired capability of an EOC can be derived from the coordination complexity of the event. ...more »

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Campaign: Support, Coordination, and Command and Management in the NIMS

Private Sector and other Non-Governmental Stakeholders in MACs

.MACS consist of a combination of elements: personnel, procedures, protocols, business practices, and communications integrated into a common system. For the purpose of coordinating resources and support between multiple jurisdictions, The ‘WHOLE COMMUNITY’ (Public-Private Partnerships, NVOADs, VOADs, NGOs, CI/KR, Faith-Based, etc.) need to be integrated not only into the MAC but also as equal partners in the emergency ...more »

Submitted by (@mjcyranwd6alm)

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Including Private Sector in Mgmt (Command Org)

If NIMS is going to be a qualification based system retirees, as well as others who have earned the qualification should be capable of and perform in the Command roles on an Incident. The USCG (OPA-90) has already adopted this to include the responsible in the Command structure (Unified Command) on an incident. It seems short sighted that people who are not currently in a government organization cannot perform in a Command ...more »

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RECOMMENDATION CREATING DEPUTY SAFETY OFFICER POSITION

Recommendation: Formalize the creation of a Deputy Safety Officer (DSOFR) under the National Incident Management System (NIMS). For more complex incidents, the Safety Officer (SOFR) may have one or more deputies, who may be from the same or an assisting agency as appointed/approved by the Incident Commander. Background: • The SOFR is a critical member of the command staff to advise the Incident Commander/Unified ...more »

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