Presidential Policy Directive 8

Everyone can contribute to safeguarding the nation from harm.” This sentiment, expressed by President Obama, is the foundation of Presidential Policy Directive 8 (PPD-8). PPD-8, signed by President Obama in March 2011, calls on all levels of government, the private and nonprofit sectors, and individual citizens to play a more active and well-defined role in strengthening the nation’s security and resiliency. PPD-8 sets a vision for an America that is prepared for our greatest risks, such as terrorist attacks, natural disasters, or pandemics. The directive calls for a number of actions to be taken in the near term to improve our security and resilience.

With help from across the whole community, FEMA and its partners have created a National Preparedness Goal, which sets the vision for building a more resilient and secure nation, and a National Preparedness System, which identifies the programs, processes and tools for achieving that vision.You also helped inform the contents of the first annual National Preparedness Report. The Report documents the significant progress the nation has made in the areas of prevention, protection, mitigation, response and recovery.

FEMA and its partners are now focusing on the next set of activities. This forum provides an opportunity to provide input into the development of these activities over the coming months. Your ideas and votes help us understand what works in the real world — in your community, school, or business. Together, we can make the nation more resilient and secure.

Discussion Topics:

Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@jamlobo)

Shelters with sustainable Kit

Eco Woolis is a Mexican company that has developed a geodesic shaped portable structure, based on an igloo, that once assembled becomes a shelter that is over 344 sq. ft. and over 8 ft. high. Assembling the structure is simple and the heaviest piece weighs only a little over 15 lbs. The Mexican government plans to distribute the shelters for disaster relief in Mexico. In addition to disaster relief, Eco Woolis sees a ...more »

Voting

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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@alexkaplan413)

Financial Disaster Preparedness - FEMA is spread too thin

It is predicted that 2011 was the most expensive year for disasters globally in recorded history -- $350B in economic losses. Yet only $108B was covered by insurance. The US had twelve billion dollar events this year alone and FEMA needed more emergency funding. The cost of disasters is increasing and FEMA is being spread too thin. We should work to find ways to transfer the financial risk (and cost) of these disasters ...more »

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9 votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@jason.elliott)

Create comprehensive seismic safety plan

Encourage communities in seismically active areas to create long-range plans for seismic safety in privately owned buildings. San Francisco has created a draft 30-year plan with 50 important steps that will be taken to retrofit our buildings, strengthen our communities, and prepare in advance for the next big earthquake. Here in California, we know a big one is coming, it's just a question of when, where, and how large. ...more »

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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@mhavanti)

Standardization of all forms and methods of operations

We need to have all forms standardized for all regions and sections. We need a repository to access these forms no matter where you're standing up an office. The forms also need to be kept updated so that individuals in each declaration doesn't decide they want to make "disaster specific" forms.

 

Disaster Specific needs to stop.

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22 votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@davidnuttle)

Engineering: A Vital Part of Emergency Preparedness

Engineering mistakes and omissions tend to magnify the damage caused during major disasters. When attacked by terrorists, using aircraft as missiles, the Twin Towers reportedly collapsed quickly because steel members of those towers lacked proper insulation against fire. In the case of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans quickly flooded due to engineering mistakes on coastal areas and protective levees. One year ago, a tsunami ...more »

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7 votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@lmeyers)

Emergency Management Standard

Instead of TCLs or CCL, we should use and endorse a national standard for an emergency management program. There are a few out there such as NFPA 1600 or EMAP. I like these because they require documentation to prove you have a Mitigation Plan as an example. I think the fundamental failure of TCL and potentially with CCL is that it is a check the box and the box is vague and not the reality for most across the country. ...more »

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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@chapkcjames)

CBRNE Aftermath and Spiritual Support Preparation

In aniticipation of a disaster where a community/area may experience a CBRNE event, the familiar will quickly turn into a scene of major disruption. Neighborhoods will be made unrecognizable and the daily flow of "business as usual" will suddenly change without warning. Many people will seek out the help of available religious leadership and look for solice in the spiritual symbols of their faith to empower and sustain ...more »

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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@davidnuttle)

Tracking Beacons for Persons Living in High-Threat Areas

Tracking beacons have become smaller, more reliable, and less costly. These beacons are now being used as part of fleet management, the they track contestants in rallies or races, and are used for special operations. For persons who insist on living in flood zones, or other high threat areas, I suggest that life insurance companies provide reduced premium payments for policy holders who buy a beacon and keep it with them. ...more »

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3 votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@creativeogre)

HSPD-8 vs. PPD8

HSPD-8 vs. PPD8 Sitting here, rereading both of these documents...I am still trying to figure out what the REAL differences are between them. Considering the fact that the HSPD-8 is referenced in many areas of FEMA documentation, and that there really is no MAJOR changes from the HSPD-8, one can only wonder if this directive was issued as a political move, which really has no merit in emergency planning, or if it is ...more »

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13 votes
14 up votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@davidnuttle)

Resolving the "Ghost" Response Problem(s)

In attempting to deal with major disasters, a significant number of first responders and support personnel (such as bus drivers needed for emergency urban evacuation) do not report for duty. Typically, they have gone to help their own families escape or recover from the disaster. To deal with this problem it is necessary to have extra emergency response personnel ... and to have plans to assist the families of these ...more »

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8 votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@nursepam2010)

FEMA / Medical Reserve Corps

The Medical Reserve Corp is set up in regions across the USA. My unit is the CNY-MRC (Central NY). We are highly trained medical professionals that started as disaster relief medical help that has progressed in to community health back-up, assisting the health dept handle rabies clinics, vaccine clinics, etc. We are sometimes needed as back-up for paid org's (Dept of Public Health). As it stands now, we can not go ...more »

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7 votes
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Presidential Policy Directive 8

Submitted by (@conniewhite)

Integrate Social Media & Web 2.0 Technology into Operations

There are many tools available to help share information such as video, text, images, maps & sound. There are many different types of social media (twitter, youtube, FB, mapping). Social Media and Web 2.0 technology can handle larger capacities, is scalable, flexible and adaptable. This should be integrated into the day to day operations building community resilience between officials, agencies, and civilians (all-of-Nation) ...more »

Voting

13 votes
16 up votes
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