(@jaleesa.tate)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Additional Flexibility Required to Implement Infrastructure

FEMA must clearly define what activities will be eligible with regards to infrastructure projects. Additional funding will be required in order for applicants/subapplicants to pursue Advance Assistance opportunities to fund the tasks required to develop an infrastructure subapplication. Implementation of infrastructure projects will require an extended Period of Performance versus the current standard 36 months time... more »

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(@david.winks)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Electromagnetic protection for water and waste water systems

To avoid unplanned mass migration out of cities due to a prolonged power outage, it would be a good use of pre-disaster mitigation funding to install electromagnetic pulse protection on water and wastewater pumps to prevent damage from induced current surges. The protection can be extended to the switchgear and the substation transformers. As a second step, mitigation funding could be used to install electromagnetically... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Funding & Resource Management

FEMA should allot full six percent of Disaster Relief fund to BRIC

The legislative language gives discretion to FEMA to determine up to six percent of funding. There is clearly a national need for the full six percent of the funding to be invested. Many studies including the most recent National Institute of Building Sciences, Natural Hazard Mitigation Saves, report published in January 2018, documents a $7 risk reduction benefit for every $1 invested on riverine mitigation actions and... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

BRIC should not fund traditional infrastructure and project work typically overseen and funded by other federal agencies

It is important that BRIC funds not be used to fund investment in traditional grey infrastructure work that is typically funded by other federal agencies and through other federal sources of funding. Larger scale infrastructure projects are funded by other agencies depending on their purpose. Water infrastructure is funded by Army Corps, Bureau of Reclamation and transportation infrastructure is funded by Department... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should ensure that funding is accessible for frontline communities in the face of climate change.

It has been well established that low-income communities are more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change through a combination of higher overall exposure and limited capacity to adapt to, or recover from, impacts and disasters as they occur. In light of that, the BRIC program should serve as an essential tool in helping these communities make themselves more resilient. While no formally stated dis-incentive exists... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should require consideration of climate impacts for designing and implementing projects.

When providing BRIC funding for projects, to ensure the investments are sustainable into the future, all projects should be required to incorporate into designs increased flood risk because of increased sea level rise, associated storm surge as well as increased intense rain events and increased catastrophic wildfire events.
Absent of incorporating these increased trends driven in part by climate change, infrastructure... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should fund planning and studies that assess vulnerability and risk reduction solutions

The BRIC program should continue to fund essential planning work as well as studies and tools that help prioritize cost effective efforts. FEMA's Pre-Disaster Mitigation program has been an essential source of federal funding for conducting vulnerability assessments and developing hazard mitigation plans. It is essential that communities use the best available science to assess their current risk of disasters and conduct... more »

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Lifelines

Prioritizing community infrastructure

The American Flood Coalition supports funding for adaptation and resilience measures for community infrastructure, which aligns with FEMA's goals of incorporating the concept of community lifelines into the framework for the BRIC program. Community infrastructure can include transportation networks, hospitals, emergency response centers, water and wastewater facilities, and telecommunications and utility infrastructure.... more »

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Capacity & Capability Building

Training and technical assistance

To assist communities in building capacity, the American Flood Coalition supports increasing training and technical assistance. FEMA should develop guides to help communities better understand and implement creative financing mechanisms such as public-private partnerships. In particular, small and rural communities with limited staff could use training and technical assistance from FEMA to increase capacity. FEMA trainings... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should continue to fund strategic buyouts targeted in the highest risk areas

The BRIC Program should continue to fund strategic buyouts targeted in the highest risk areas and in a way that will maximize risk reduction and deliver additional environmental benefits. FEMA has long funded strategic buyouts through its mitigation grant programs and BRIC should continue to fund that work. The buyout work should also be paired with restoration of the underlying land to maximize the risk reduction and... more »

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Funding & Resource Management

Increased funding and creative financing mechanisms

The American Flood Coalition supports increased funding for pre-disaster mitigation and flood risk reduction infrastructure projects. While funding for the BRIC program is already established through a set-aside of up to 6% of disaster spending transferred from the disaster relief fund, the Coalition would support additional efforts to obtain supplemental funds for pre-disaster mitigation, such as incorporating new funding... more »

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Hazard Mitigation Planning

Planning and technical assistance

The American Flood Coalition supports increasing the percentage of BRIC funds to be used for planning and technical assistance. FEMA should ensure that planning grants that allow for preliminary engineering studies, vulnerability assessments, and other early-stage project planning activities are eligible projects under the BRIC program. These types of studies are often required to determine the scope of flood mitigation... more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

BRIC should adopt rules that consider the potential for any adverse impacts associated with infrastructure investments

Traditional grey infrastructure often is built to address a challenge such as flood risk reduction. While it may serve that purpose for the useful life of the built project, eventually significant maintenance and rebuilding costs are needed if the infrastructure purpose is going to continue. And while grey infrastructure may serve a purpose, it often comes at the expense of degrading or harming other environmental benefits... more »

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Benefit-Cost Analysis (BCA)

Accounting for nature-based solutions in BCA

The American Flood Coalition supports determining ways to quantify the value of nature-based solutions and account for the benefits of natural infrastructure in the BRIC program's benefit-cost analysis. FEMA should give equal consideration to both traditional "gray" infrastructure projects and projects that incorporate nature-based solutions or natural infrastructure for flood mitigation and flood risk reduction. Currently,... more »

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Building Codes & Enforcement

Resources to aid communities in building code adoption

The American Flood Coalition supports the development of training materials and guides to help communities gain a better understanding of the importance of updated building codes and how building codes are passed and implemented. Less than 35 percent of communities have adopted the most up-to-date hazard-resistant building codes. Training and resources for building officials and elected local officials is one way to encourage... more »

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