Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

Our nation’s resilience depends on you and your neighbors preparing for potential hazards in your communities. We want to increase outreach efforts and encourage everyone to take actionable steps to be prepared.

We’ve extended the conversation period and your posts on the topics listed below will help us begin to develop a national campaign encouraging people to take actions in their everyday lives to prepare for disasters. This effort is a major part of Presidential Policy Directive 8 / PPD-8: National Preparedness – and it is one of the most visible ways the whole community will be involved in keeping our nation safe and resilient.

Click the links below to access the topic’s page, where you can post your ideas, and read and comment on others’ ideas. We look forward to hearing from you now and as more topics are posted.

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

National preparedness standards

While not an advocate of a Federal law for everything, I think national preparedness must indeed be NATIONAL. The states have uneven preparedness mandates for schools, but schools could be the foundation of national preparedness efforts. Schools could devote an hour or two each month for some aspect of age-appropriate preparedness instruction. This information will, in my experience, find its way to the students' homes, ...more »

Submitted by (@bnoder)

Voting

-4 votes
2 up votes
6 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

the go list

establish an on line community support tool for people who need to relocate or leave early from a potential disaster area. Engage the community to support others who need to be empowered to act, taking a shared responsibility for their own safety. Either you are leaving early or are supporting someone who is.

www.thegolist.org.au

Submitted by (@mfarrow)

Voting

-3 votes
2 up votes
5 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

Building and Sustaining Preparedness

Schools, churches, after school venues and youth organizations are ideal target locations and groups to promote thiscampaign topic nationally. Just like fire safety and fire, tornado and earthquake drills are practiced regularly throughout the school year, national preparedness could be added as well. Young children are like sponges so they are sure to soak up all of this preparedness info. and talk it up at home. Word ...more »

Submitted by (@considercherise)

Voting

9 votes
9 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

City knows best

Wife and I have both taken the Coumminty Emergency responce training. I even took the train the trainer program. above the director of our city teem objection. She toold me I could not take it I told her the state of Missouri said I could. So to get even she will not allow me to teach any classes. So I took on the passion of spreading the work to church or any one who wants to learn. I have found that people think it ...more »

Submitted by (@gemayer1025)

Voting

4 votes
5 up votes
1 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

The First 72

While there are many variations of 72-hour preparedness plans, none are pocket size. "The First 72" could be a basic tri-fold pamphlet (8 1/2 X 11 paper size ... similar to other products FEMA distributes) that could easily fit in a person's pocket or purse. If it was cost-effective, this pamphlet could be laminated for extra durability. This tri-fold style would create six panels; one for a cover and key points and ...more »

Submitted by (@generomano1)

Voting

5 votes
5 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

take human nature into account

It strikes me that the biggest barrier to building and sustaining preparedness is human nature. When incidents happen in rapid succession (example: repeated tornados in the Mid-West) people suffer from burnout/ disaster fatigue. When incidents carry high consequences but low likelihood or long inter-incident intervals, people dismiss the risk as being too remote and unlikely and get complacent. In my opinion, this makes ...more »

Submitted by (@diane.matuszak)

Voting

2 votes
2 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

concrete steps for citizens

Over time, we need to shift focus of citizens’ response and recovery expectations from federal level to local and state/territorial/tribe levels (correct public misperceptions and inflated expectations regarding federal role in response and recovery)It is important to educate the general population on concrete steps that can be taken to minimize (mitigate) risk such as strictly enforced building codes, flood insurance ...more »

Submitted by (@diane.matuszak)

Voting

1 vote
3 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

marketing

Take advantage of post- incident heightened awareness, focusing on the opportunity to exploit mitigation. Build on marketing or advertising experience thus far “See something, say something” is easy to remember and has borne some fruit and it will likely continue to be useful for suspicious activity and perhaps for some technical/accidental events when there may be warning signs of imminent system failure. I was thinking ...more »

Submitted by (@diane.matuszak)

Voting

3 votes
3 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

Self Reliance

The first step in a preparedness campaign should be to dtermine the behavior(s) we seek to change. Should it be "have a kit?" "Have a plan?" Perhaps. Suggest the overriding behavior change be self reliance. Suggest we develop a preparedness campaign that promotes self reliance over entitlement and unrealistic expectations.

Submitted by

Voting

7 votes
9 up votes
2 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

Make it simple, easy, and part of everyday life

Pioneering work done after the Loma Prieta Earthquake (1989) where grants were given to community-based organizations to fund activities to enhance preparedness resulted in lessons that have not been remembered nor applied well after Sept. 11, 2001. Fundamentally, the most important lesson is "make it simple, easy, and a part of everyday life." When provided 1,000-item lists of "stuff" to buy, or lists of "gotta do's" ...more »

Submitted by (@rockylopes)

Voting

13 votes
13 up votes
0 down votes
Active

Building and Sustaining Preparedness: A National Campaign

Communicate Consistently

Much research has demonstrated that people are bombarded with multiple forms of media. Further, the vast majority of people who use on-line resources use a search engine, like Google. Despite giving them a direct URL to a favored disaster prep info site, people will just search for info on a topic. Think about it, when was the last time you used a bookmark or typed in a direct URL into your web browser? People find all ...more »

Submitted by (@rockylopes)

Voting

9 votes
10 up votes
1 down votes
Active