Mitigation Investment for the Nation

The Mitigation Framework Leadership Group is seeking input on topics related to the National Mitigation Investment Strategy.  The goal of the strategy is to identify data, information, ideas, and experience to help guide national investments in disaster resilience and hazard mitigation.

Major disasters like Hurricane Sandy, EF-5 tornadoes in Oklahoma and extreme weather events in Colorado persistently test our Nation’s capacity to adapt and recover. Federal, state, local, tribal, territorial, non-profit, and private sector organizations have accepted the challenge to make communities and critical infrastructure less susceptible to these hazards.

However, each organization has different approaches, funding sources, mandates, and requirements for investing in efforts to mitigate disaster risk. This has created a complicated mix of priorities and pathways for communities to navigate if they want to incorporate mitigation and long-term disaster resilience into planning, building and rebuilding.

A National Mitigation Investment Strategy accomplishes two goals:

  • Increases the effectiveness of investments in reducing disaster losses and increases community resilience
  • Engages stakeholders across the nation in identifying and implementing strategies that can help guide resource allocation decisions by the federal government, as well as, state, local, tribal and territorial entities.

Please feel free to comment on or discuss this topic or any of these topics. If you prefer to e-mail your response directly, e-mail it to fema-nmis@fema.dhs.gov (The e-mail address is case sensitive, so please use all lower case). For more information and opportunities to provide input, please visit our website at www.fema.gov/national-mitigation-framework.

We look forward to hearing from you.

Resilient Built Environment

  • Examples of how you, your business, professional organization or community planned or invested to mitigate natural hazard risks, either in anticipation or because of a disaster. Mitigation measures could include building or infrastructure design improvements.
  • Examples of factors (events, people, experiences) that influenced you as a person, business, professional organization or community in deciding to make investments in becoming more resilient to disasters.
  • Examples of financial, technical or other assistance, or incentives, that were available to help support decision making and financing, and from whom (federal, state, local, private, or other).
  • Examples of types assistance you may have sought, but the assistance was not available with respect to necessary timing, coordination, or other constraints

Improved Coordination of Disaster Risk Management among Federal, State, Local, Tribal, Territorial, and Private Entities

  • Examples of your experience with disaster mitigation or resiliency coordination, both positive and negative.
  • Examples of how different levels of government streamlined interactions in order to facilitate resilience investments.

State, Local, Tribal and Territorial Governments Increasingly Share Fiscal Responsibility for Risk Reduction with the Federal Government

  • Examples from non-federal governmental organizations that have invested their own resources in a disaster resilience measure or program.
  • Describe any incentives that may encourage non-federal government investment.

Increased Private Sector Involvement in Resilience Finance

  • Examples of private sector organizations that helped with individual or community resilience implementation.
  • Examples of any innovations or new ideas generated by the private sector used to implement a resiliency measure for a community or individual.
  • Examples of any challenges or barriers for the private sector to implement a resiliency measure for a community or individual.
  • Share your thoughts on how the government can more effectively engage private businesses and citizens in sharing responsibility for disaster risk reduction, including activities and investments to mitigate risk and build resilience.

Improved Provision of Federal Data and Digital Services to Support Risk-informed Mitigation Investment

  • Examples of how you use technical data from Federal agencies when considering your disaster risks and implementing resiliency measures where the information was helpful and useful
  • Examples of challenges in accessing or using Federal data.

Improved Disaster Risk Communication Resulting in Increased Risk Awareness and Risk Reduction

  • Examples of specific programs or ad campaigns that motivated you to take an action to reduce your risk, as well as examples of risk communication that did not.

Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Shareing mitigation programs ionsto surviving juririsdicti

The Public Assistance program is improving its delivery to our surviving jurisdictions. One of our greatest needs is informing them of various mitigation funding sources that they might want to prevent future damages. FEMA has a current shortage on those able to get to those gathered for applicant briefings. To better deliver this information, professional presentation mechanisms could be provided to explain the various ...more »

Submitted by (@warren.welch)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Using Section 323 of the Stafford Act

Section 323 of the Stafford Act (Minimum Standards for Public and Private Structures) ":The President may require safe land use and construction practices after adequate consultation with this section with appropriate state and local officials." In areas without land use management (and floodplain management, building codes, coastal zone management and zoning) simply rebuilding and replacing current damaged housing and ...more »

Submitted by (@steve.colman)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Strategic Foresight and Hazard Mitigation

A focus on Strategic Foresight and Resiliance in the Hazard Mitigation Grant process could yield long term costs benefits. For years we have been granting money with little effort spent on evaluating the down stream benefits. Leveraging an operational approach to the evaluation of those grants before and after disaster could help states make better decision on which projects to approve. Additionally putting the responsibility ...more »

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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

PA Green Pilot Project

Sustainable practices with PA money. In the spirit of Executive Order 13693, DHS Directive 025-01, and FEMA Directive (FD) 108-3, Sustainable Performance and Environmental Management (initiatives that establish sustainability goals and meet federal and DHS requirements) and cognizant of climate change, the PA program could offer a pilot program where states could choose to obtain a reduction in the 25% cost-share, on ...more »

Submitted by (@lindapoll)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Changing Mitigation Grants to before a declaration occurs

Changing Mitigation funding to before a disaster is probably not a wise change to the Stafford Act. 1. Doing so will give back to Congress the 15% that now automatically goes to each State or Tribe, when they get a Declaration, regardless of that State or Tribe's political ranking of importance to Congress. 2. Letting the misfortunes of Nature dictate who gets the $ may be a sad way to have to get $, but at least it's ...more »

Submitted by (@allen.barrett)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

GPS for alerting, planning, and aid

FEMA’s smartphone Apps should be updated to allow for GPS location data. When a disaster strikes, FEMA could send a message through the App and directs the public, based on their location, to the closest shelter or area for local help. This new ability would aid officials in directing their efforts to save the living, injured, and hold efforts on recovering casualties. The location system would both detect and color ...more »

Submitted by (@coulterjohnson)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

What Works

I once worked for a temp agency, filling out paperwork for people to be reimbursed for damage done to their homes by a hurricane. It was even promised that some could be rebuilt. But the were not clear, and would change. For example, when we started, we would scan receipts, sometimes dozens per client, that were from when they had paid for work or supplies for their homes. A few weeks into it, and we were told to ...more »

Submitted by (@amagra11)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Resilience Resource Matrix / Forum

In a discussion with a colleague at the 2017 HMA Stakeholders Workshop, I thought of an idea based on a need that we discussed. There are many beneficial federal programs related to resilience which was evident from the speakers at the Workshop and from previous experience. However, it can be difficult for a state, tribal or local government to find the resilience resources they may need to protect their communities. ...more »

Submitted by (@lawrence.frank1993)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

iteractive Emergency Preparedness Network

The iEPN Empowering Children and Strengthening Resiliency – The iEPN is a youth-centered participatory tool for disaster climate adaptation and disaster risk reduction. The interactive Emergency Preparedness Network, according to Kevin Smith Director of the Salvation Army Emergency Services, Southeast Division State of Florida, recently retired Wayne Sallade Senior Director of Emergency Management Charlotte County Florida, ...more »

Submitted by (@bud4case)
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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Incentivizing Disaster Preparedness, Kenneth Knox, M.A.

Given that there is a substantial relationship between disaster preparedness and the ability to mitigate loss of life, the pursuit of increased preparedness by the American public is a worthwhile goal. Because the public has a propensity to wait for some form of warning of a disaster before they begin to prepare for it, they are vulnerable to disaster. Strategic use of incentives in the form of tax credits, deductions ...more »

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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

Civilan workforce deployment through Federal Enterprise Centers

Growing congestion, extended commutes and increased reliance on transportation in rapidly growing extended metropolitan areas represents potentially one of the greatest vulnerabilities to respond to emergencies. It is the 'displacement' of tens or hundreds of thousands of civilian workers from their home communities. In a times of crisis, evacuations are the most costly aspects of response. Add to a crisis situation ...more »

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Mitigation Investment for the Nation

You May Also E-Mail Comments Directly to fema-nmis@fema.dhs.gov

Below are topics of interest for which we would like to generate dialogue: 1) Resilient Built Environment 2) Coordination of Disaster Risk Management among Federal, State, Local, Tribal, Territorial, and Private Entities 3) State, Local, Tribal and Territorial Governments Sharing Fiscal Responsibility for Risk 4) Reduction with the Federal Government 5) Private Sector Involvement in Resilience Finance 6) Provision of ...more »

Submitted by (@kathleen.boyer)
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