Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Topic 1: Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

FEMA envisions that the BRIC program, once established, will focus on traditional mitigation projects and incentivize new, innovative large infrastructure projects that build resilient communities and reduces risks from all hazards.

FEMA seeks your opinions on:

  • The amount and type of technical assistance FEMA should provide to applicants in applying for and implementing infrastructure mitigation projects
  • What challenges you foresee in implementing these types of mitigation projects
(@katherine1)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Advanced Energy Management Alliance

Regarding the Building Resilient Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (BRIC), Advanced Energy Management Alliance recommends that communities and third party Distributed Energy Resource (DER) solutions providers be enabled to partner under this program. AEMA has weighed in on numerous government proceedings regarding resilience, including at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Puerto Rico's microgrid proceeding, and ...more »

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(@katherine1)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Scale Microgrid Solutions

Regarding the Building Resilient Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (BRIC), Scale Microgrid Solutions recommends that clean distributed technologies such as microgrids be actively considered as resilient solutions and included in the grant program. As an example, because of the life-threatening risk of wildfires in California, utilities are having to pro-actively cut power to entire communities to prevent fires from starting ...more »

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(@jaleesa.tate)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Additional Flexibility Required to Implement Infrastructure

FEMA must clearly define what activities will be eligible with regards to infrastructure projects. Additional funding will be required in order for applicants/subapplicants to pursue Advance Assistance opportunities to fund the tasks required to develop an infrastructure subapplication. Implementation of infrastructure projects will require an extended Period of Performance versus the current standard 36 months time ...more »

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(@david.winks)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Electromagnetic protection for water and waste water systems

To avoid unplanned mass migration out of cities due to a prolonged power outage, it would be a good use of pre-disaster mitigation funding to install electromagnetic pulse protection on water and wastewater pumps to prevent damage from induced current surges. The protection can be extended to the switchgear and the substation transformers. As a second step, mitigation funding could be used to install electromagnetically ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

BRIC should not fund traditional infrastructure and project work typically overseen and funded by other federal agencies

It is important that BRIC funds not be used to fund investment in traditional grey infrastructure work that is typically funded by other federal agencies and through other federal sources of funding. Larger scale infrastructure projects are funded by other agencies depending on their purpose. Water infrastructure is funded by Army Corps, Bureau of Reclamation and transportation infrastructure is funded by Department ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should ensure that funding is accessible for frontline communities in the face of climate change.

It has been well established that low-income communities are more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change through a combination of higher overall exposure and limited capacity to adapt to, or recover from, impacts and disasters as they occur. In light of that, the BRIC program should serve as an essential tool in helping these communities make themselves more resilient. While no formally stated dis-incentive exists ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should require consideration of climate impacts for designing and implementing projects.

When providing BRIC funding for projects, to ensure the investments are sustainable into the future, all projects should be required to incorporate into designs increased flood risk because of increased sea level rise, associated storm surge as well as increased intense rain events and increased catastrophic wildfire events. Absent of incorporating these increased trends driven in part by climate change, infrastructure ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should fund planning and studies that assess vulnerability and risk reduction solutions

The BRIC program should continue to fund essential planning work as well as studies and tools that help prioritize cost effective efforts. FEMA's Pre-Disaster Mitigation program has been an essential source of federal funding for conducting vulnerability assessments and developing hazard mitigation plans. It is essential that communities use the best available science to assess their current risk of disasters and conduct ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC Program should continue to fund strategic buyouts targeted in the highest risk areas

The BRIC Program should continue to fund strategic buyouts targeted in the highest risk areas and in a way that will maximize risk reduction and deliver additional environmental benefits. FEMA has long funded strategic buyouts through its mitigation grant programs and BRIC should continue to fund that work. The buyout work should also be paired with restoration of the underlying land to maximize the risk reduction and ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

BRIC should adopt rules that consider the potential for any adverse impacts associated with infrastructure investments

Traditional grey infrastructure often is built to address a challenge such as flood risk reduction. While it may serve that purpose for the useful life of the built project, eventually significant maintenance and rebuilding costs are needed if the infrastructure purpose is going to continue. And while grey infrastructure may serve a purpose, it often comes at the expense of degrading or harming other environmental benefits ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC program should allow investing in upgrading and upsizing culverts

Nationally, a rough estimate is that 67% of culverts are not designed to allow for a 1% flood (100-yr. flood) and need upsizing. Assuming a quarter of those need immediate replacement, the savings over the life of the new culverts would be $8 trillion. Upsizing culverts has been demonstrated to withstand flood events and thus avoid any damage to surrounding roads and infrastructure. Looking at multiple sources, an average ...more »

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Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Increase resources and prioritize flood mitigation

The Coalition supports increasing resources for infrastructure resilience projects by prioritizing for flood mitigation and flood risk reduction projects within the BRIC program's eligibility criteria. According to the National Institute of Building Sciences, every $1 spent on pre-disaster mitigation saves $4-7 in disaster relief funds. Furthermore, a recent study by Pew Charitable Trusts found that flood mitigation projects ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

The BRIC program should allow investment in riverine and floodplain natural infrastrucutre

Freshwater Natural Infrastructure Types • Floodplain restoration through levee setback and habitat restoration reduces flood impacts by absorbing floodwaters as compared to funneling river flow downstream and improves water quality through absorption and filtration of water • Floodplain restoration including wetlands and banks of waterways to restore a more natural hydrologic regime provide absorptive capacity for floodwaters, ...more »

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(@nwoiwode)

Infrastructure Mitigation Projects

Forest management cost effectively protects property from catastrophic fire.

In some widespread, fire-prone forest types, unmanaged stands where fire is excluded become unhealthy and prone to uncharacteristic, high-severity wildfire, drought, and insect outbreaks. There is compelling evidence that ecological forestry—ecological thinning, prescribed burning, and managed wildfire—can reduce these risks and promote healthier, more resilient forest conditions. For example, thinning one acre of dense ...more »

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