Hazard Mitigation Planning

Topic 6: Hazard Mitigation Planning

State, tribal, and local governments engage in hazard mitigation planning to identify risks and vulnerabilities associated with natural disasters and develop long-term strategies for protecting people and property from future hazard events that can be implemented using a wide range of public and private funding. How can state, territorial, tribal, and local governments best leverage FEMA funding for Hazard Mitigation Planning to guide investments in activities and projects that will break the cycle of disaster damage, reconstruction, and repeated damage?

FEMA seeks your opinions on:

  • How the mitigation planning process can be used to increase implementation of mitigation activities and actions by state, tribal, and local officials as well as private and non-profit interests.
  • What additional support FEMA can provide, such as increased technical assistance related to the hazard mitigation planning process or investments that can be implemented to reduce vulnerabilities from future hazard events.
  • What challenges hinder the implementation of existing mitigation strategies in FEMA-approved hazard mitigation plans
  • How the identification and prioritization processes used in hazard mitigation planning can advance implementation of mitigation actions, such as adopting stronger ordinances, as well as projects
(@jaleesa.tate)

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Expand Support for Planning

Ensuring applicants/subapplicants have adequate resources and funding to develop robust, comprehensive hazard mitigation plans is the cornerstone to improving mitigation and building resilient communities. The HMA grant funding should permit conceptual designs to be incorporated into the plan development process in order to jump-start application development that will lead to implementation. FEMA should maintain the current... more »

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Hazard Mitigation Planning

Planning and technical assistance

The American Flood Coalition supports increasing the percentage of BRIC funds to be used for planning and technical assistance. FEMA should ensure that planning grants that allow for preliminary engineering studies, vulnerability assessments, and other early-stage project planning activities are eligible projects under the BRIC program. These types of studies are often required to determine the scope of flood mitigation... more »

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Hazard Mitigation Planning

Planning-Related Activities

Make planning-related activities/add-ons eligible for BRIC funding. These activities help ensure a planning process that targets BRIC-compliant, Community Lifeline-inclusive infrastructure projects.

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Hazard Mitigation Planning

Disaster Declarations Indicate Need

End the variability statement for funding eligibility. Eligibility for BRIC funding should not be penalized if a state has disaster funds available. On the contrary, having disaster activity demonstrates the need for BRIC funding. Large scale infrastructure projects that benefit communities can rarely be implemented using the relatively small amounts of mitigation funds made available post-disaster.

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Hazard Mitigation Planning

Constant Planning Funds

There has to be a constant non-disaster source of hazard mitigation planning funds in order for jurisdictions to stay compliant with the planning requirements.

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(@rodthaler)

Hazard Mitigation Planning

FEMA as catalyst & thought leader spurring creation of state Mitigation programs.• Expands Mitigation funds in those states •

State Mitigation varying by state; based on peak perils, and political realities.

Incentivize states to provide some level of matching funds and set up dedicated mitigation programs. Gain efficiencies out of the likely smaller amount of DRRA funding for home mitigation ( versus large infrastructure)FEMA should consider ways to incentivize states to develop mitigation programs, matching the pre-disaster mitigation funding... more »

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Hazard Mitigation Planning

Create an Alaska Tribal Mitigation Team with two new full-time permanent positions to support projects

Current levels of FEMA technical assistance, including from the Alaska FEMA Tribal Liaison and Region 10 staff, are not adequate to make the PDM program effective for our rural communities. Existing staff, including at the State of Alaska Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management, provide a basic level of technical assistance regarding program requirements and limitations. However, full-time staff to navigate... more »

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(@rick.dembroski)

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Keep Planning available

Maybe I missed it but I don't see anywhere in DRRA with PDM being phased out where local or tribal mitigation planning will still be able to be done in anything other than HMGP. The long time lines from submission to award on HMGP isn't the best vehcile for mitigation plans at all. Where in the DRRA is access to planning grant funds ? We need to keep that in the program somewhere otherwise small rural or native population... more »

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(@rick.dembroski)

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Advanaced Assistance & Project Development

Hazard Mitigation Plans should have a requirement or checklist for actionable items and plan maintenance. If a community gets a plan and fails to act on a single thing in it there should be some sort of check and balance. Otherwise mit plans are just paper that a community does with FEMA or State funds and it sits on a shelf so they can be eligible for a project "maybe". In small rural areas like we have in Alaska mit... more »

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(@wlogue)

Hazard Mitigation Planning

What good is all the non-essential information

There is a lot of information that is filler in most mitigation plans, at all levels. Why isn't there an effort to streamline the plan and do away with the feel good stuff. Granted you need to know your hazard and how it affects your state, county or municipality but there is a lot of filler charts and graphs that the normal reader could care less about. You also need the projects that need/should put in the plan to alleviate... more »

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(@dhiebert)

Hazard Mitigation Planning

Effective planning, programmatic focus, and the plan to project pipeline.

Effective mitigation planning is done by moving the process away from the check-the-box outcome and toward a focus on the identification of precise vulnerabilities and the development of action plans to address those vulnerabilities. King County is using an asset-based approach to identify key vulnerable assets and then develop action plans to address them. Action plans are multi-year, step-by-step approaches to address... more »

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